The SANBI Bookshop sells books published by SANBI Graphics & Editing. The bookshop is located at the National Herbarium in the Pretoria National Botanical Garden and is open from 08:00 to 16:00, Monday to Friday (excluding public holidays).

All SANBI publications can be downloaded at no cost – please see the links to our journals, publication series and posters below.

For local orders of hard copies of SANBI books, or should you have any queries, please contact:
Thembi Masilela – SANBI Bookshop Manager
Tel.: +27 12 843 5900
Cell no: +27 82 557 5599
E-mail: sanbibookshop@sanbi.org.za

For international orders and deliveries of hard copies of SANBI books, please follow the link to ProVisions website or contact Sameera Limalia at sameera@provisions.co.za.
Tel: +27 31 337 2112
Cell: +27 81 039 4647

SANBI journals, publications and posters

 Copyright

All publications listed were published by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), previously the National Botanical Institute (NBI).

No part of these publications may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the copyright owner (SANBI). Should permission be granted for commercial or non-commercial use, or to reproduce any part of these publications, SANBI must be acknowledged as the copyright owner.

The views and opinions expressed in the publications do not necessarily reflect those of SANBI. The authors and publisher have made their best efforts to prepare these publications and make no representation or warranties of any kind with regard to the completeness or accuracy of the contents therein. All images in the publications have been reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the artists concerned and no responsibility is accepted by the publisher or printer for any infringement of copyright or otherwise arising from the contents of these publications. Every effort has been made to ensure that the credits accurately comply with the information supplied by the authors.

Bothalia, African Biodiversity & Conservation

The journal formerly known as Bothalia has expanded its scope to cover both plant and animal research and is now known as Bothalia, African Biodiversity & Conservation. Visit our website to browse published papers (full papers freely available online) and/or to submit your own: https://www.abcjournal.org
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Bothalia

Bothalia published original papers and short notes dealing with the flora and vegetation of southern Africa and related subjects. Contributions to the Flora of southern Africa were also published in this series. Previous volumes of Bothalia not listed here are available for download on Internet Archives.
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Vol. 43,2 (Oct. 2013)
Bothalia_43_2 Nine articles, including: The Cape genus Micranthus (Iridaceae: Crocoideae), nomenclature and taxonomy; New taxa of Hesperantha (Iridaceae: Crocoideae) from the southern African winter rainfall region and a review of the H. pilosa complex; Eight new species of Moraea (Iridaceae) from southern African with range extensions and morphological notes in the genus; FSA Contribution 22: Asteraceae: Calenduleae: Garuleum; The native and naturalised species of Peltocalathos and Ranunculus (Ranunculaceae: Ranunculeae) in southern Africa; and A new infrageneric classification for Mesembryanthemum (Aizoaceae: Mesembryanthemoideae). Nineteen new species of Albuca, Hesperantha, Isoëtes, Lessertia, Micranthus, Moraea and Pelargonium.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 43,1 (May 2013)
Bothalia43_1 Eleven articles, including: A taxonomic review of the dry-fruited species of Anemone (Ranunculaceae) in southern Africa; Pollen morphology of members of southern African Boerhavia and Commicarpus (Nyctaginaceae); A revised infrageneric classification and synopsis of the Afro-Eurasian genus Moraea (Iridaceae: Irideae); Review of chromosome cytology in Moraea (Iridaceae: Irideae): what chromosomes reveal about the evolution of the genus; Exsiccatae in the bryophyte collection of the National Herbarium, Pretoria. New species of Chenolea and Lasiosiphon.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 42,2 (Oct. 2012)
Bothalia42_2 Ten articles, including: The emerging invasive alien plants of the Drakensberg Alpine Centre, southern Africa; Systematics of the southern African genus Ixia (Iridaceae: Crocoideae): 4. Revision of sect. Dichone; Systematics of the hypervariable Moraea tripetala complex (Iridaceae: Iridoideae) of the southern African winter rainfall zone; A taxonomic revision of the southern African native and naturalized species of Silene (Caryophyllaceae); Nomenclature and typification of southern African species of Euphorbia. Eighteen new species and eight new subspecies of Babiana, Euphorbia, Ixia, Moraea and Silene.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 42,1 (May 2012)
Bothalia42_1 Seven articles, including: Revision of the genus Sphenostylis (Fabaceae: Phaseoleae) in South Africa and Swaziland; anatomy of myxospermic diaspores of selected species in the Succulent Karoo, Namaqualand, South Africa; recircumscription and distribution of elements of the ‘Ceterach cordatum’ complex (Asplenium: Aspleniaceae) in southern Africa; new species of Bauhinia, Berkheya, Cyanella and Osteospermum.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 41,2 (Oct. 2011)
Bothalia41_2 Fourteen articles, including: Ornithoglossum pulchrum (Colchicaceae: Colchiceae), a new species from southern Namibia; taxonomic revision of the genus Thereianthus (Iridaceae: Crocoideae); review of the genus Xenoscapa (Iridaceae: Crocoideae), including X. grandiflora, a new species from southern Namibia; phytosociological description of norite koppies in the Rustenburg area, North-West Province, and refinement of the distribution of the Norite Koppies Bushveld on the national vegetation classification map of South Africa; the extended occurrence of Maputaland Wood Grassland further south in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; new species of Albuca, Ammocharis, Lachnospermum, Ornithoglossum, Rhynchosia, Romulea, Thereianthus, Xenoscapa and Xiphotheca. A tribute to the outgoing technical editor, Beverley Momberg, is also included.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 41,1 (May 2011)
Bothalia_41_1 Eight articles, including: Systematics and biology of the African genus Ferraria; annotated catalogue of the flowering plants of São Tomé and Príncipe; a conspectus of Combretum in southern Africa; generic status of Quisqualis; new liverwort distribution records in South Africa; a review of the medicinal ethnobotany of Lesotho; new pteridophyte records for the flora of Swaziland; new species of Adenogramma, Ferraria, Ixia, Metathelypteris, Pilularia, Tritonia and Wahlenbergia; new subspecies of Cheilanthes, Ferraria, Gasteria and Ixia. A tribute to the outgoing scientific editor, Gerrit Germishuizen, is also included.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 40,2 (Oct. 2010)
Bothalia40_2 Nine articles, including: Taxonomic notes on the Clathraceae (Phallales: Phallomycetidae) and Bottomly’s species of Lycoperdon (Lycoperdaceae–Gasteromycetes); checklist of ferns and seed plants of the Golden Gate Highlands National Park; discussion on the perceived homogeneity of West Coast Renosterveld and the implication for conservation; new species of Berkheya, Bulbinella, Colchicum, Didymosalpinx, Geosiris, Helictotrichon, Heterorhachis, Moraea, Nemesia, Oxyanthus, Pentameris and Senecio.

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Vol. 40,1 (May 2010)
Bothalia40_1 Eight articles, including: A generic classification of the Restioneae of southern Africa; pollen and reproductive morphology of Rhigiophyllum and Siphocodon; floristic composition of wetlands of the South African section of the Maloti-Drakensberg Transfrontier Park; an ecological review of harvesting impacts on wetland plants; new species of Aloe, Babiana, Brunia, Elegia, Ixia, Restio, Rhodocoma, Thamnea, Trieenia and Zaluzianskya; new subspecies of Babiana.

Price SADC R138.00

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Vol. 39,2 (Oct. 2009)
Bothalia39_2 Nine articles, including: Taxonomy of the genus Keetia (Rubiaceae–Ixoroideae); Aloe names, with notes on nomenclature and typification; the botany of the Cunene-Zambezi expedition with notes on Hugo Baum; new species of Acacia, Albuca, Drimia, Euphorbia, Geissorhiza, Panicum and Pseudogaltonia; new subspecies of Pseudoprospero and Trichoneura.

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Vol. 39,1 (May 2009)
Bothalia39_1 Twelve articles, including: Aloe in Angola; a revision of Fumariaceae in southern Africa; a review of the genus Curtisia; taxonomy and phylogeny of two subgroups of Pelargonium section Otidia (Geraniaceae); closing bodies in the capsular fruits of Aizoaceae–Ruschioideae; new species of Aloe, Diascia, Gladiolus, Moraea and Nemesia; new subspecies of Cysticapnos.

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Vol. 38,2 (Oct. 2008)
Bothalia38_2 Ten articles, including: Systematics of the southern African Ixia (Iridaceae); updates and corrections in Asteraceae; developmental variation in a species of Isoglossa (Acanthaceae–Ruellioideae); species delimitation in Carvalhoa campanulata (Apocynaceae–Rauvolfioideae); diversity and species turnover on an altitudinal gradient in the Western Cape, South Africa: baseline data for monitoring range shifts in response to climate change; new species of Aponogeton, Drosera, Gymnosporia, Ixia and Selaginella.

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Vol. 38,1 (May 2008)
Bothalia38_1 Nine articles, including: Systematics of the southern African Ixia subgenus Morphixia (Iridaceae); the genus Solanum (Solanaceae) in southern Africa: subgenus Leptostemonum, section Giganteiformia; the genus Wellstedia (Boraginaceae: Wellstedioideae) in southern Africa; vegetation and vegetation-environment relationships at Grootbos Nature Reserve, Western Cape; resource demand estimates for sustainable forest management in Mngazana Mangrove Forest, South Africa; new species of Asparagus, Babiana, Drimiopsis, Euclea, Huernia, Ixia, Metalasia, Oxalis, Romulea and Tripteris; new subspecies of Ixia.

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Vol. 37,2 (Oct. 2007)
Bothalia37_2 Eleven articles, including: A revision of Ornithogalum subgenus Aspasia section Aspasia, the chincherinchees; name changes in the Old World Rhus and recognition of Searsia; invasive, naturalized and casual alien plants in southern Africa; stem diameter and bark surface area of the fluted trunk of Balanites maughamii; seasonal variation in soil seed bank size in Maputaland; new species of Aristea, Ceraria, Dewinteria, Drimia, Hesperantha, Nivenia and Ornithogalum; new genus: Dewinteria.

Price SADC R126.50

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Vol. 37,1 (May 2007)
Bothalia37_1 Eleven articles, including: The medicinal use of shrubby legumes in Lesotho; threatened Limestone Fynbos plant communities; the proposal to conserve the name Acacia at the 17th International Botanical Congress; tribute to Elsie Esterhuysen; new species of Aspalathus, Cliffortia, Commiphora, Cyrtanthus, Huernia, Lachenalia, Rabdosiella, Trachyandra and Vigna; new variety in Cliffortia.

Price SADC R126.50

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Vol. 36,2 (Oct. 2006)
Bothalia36_2 Eleven articles, including: Patterns of plant diversity and endemism in Namibia; comparisons of invasive plants in southern African originating from southern temperate, northern temperate, and tropical regions; new species of Iridaceae from the Hantam-Roggeveld Centre of Endemism, and the Bokkeveld, Northern Cape, South Africa; new species of Corchorus, Ixia, Lachenalia, Moraea, Pentaschistis, Romulea and Spiloxene.

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Vol. 36,1 (May 2006)
Bothalia36_1 Eleven articles, including: a taxonomic revision of Merciera (Campanulaceae); Hypoxis: list of species and infraspecific names; Sesotho names for exotic and indigenous edible plants in southern Africa; reappraisal and identification of Olinia rochetiana (Oliniaceae) in South Africa; floristic composition of gold and uranium tailings dams on South Africa’s deep-level mines; new species of Aloe, Commiphora, Drimia, Erica, Maerua, Nemesia and Ornithogalum; new variety in Clivia.

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Flowering Plants of Africa

This peer-reviewed, biennial serial publishes colour plates with accompanying text and images of African plants. It aims to stimulate an interest in the study, conservation and cultivation of African plants, and advance the science of botany and botanical art.
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Vol. 68. Plates 2381–2400 (June 2023)
FPA68 Twenty full-colour plates and descriptions of plants appear in this peer-reviewed biennial series, which has become a collector’s item of the African and specifically South African flora. This volume is dedicated to Prof. Estrela Figueiredo, prolific author of over 300 papers and books on various botanical topics, and recipient of the Rudolf Marloth Medal of the Botanical Society of South Africa for her work towards popularising the flora of South Africa. Contributions to this colourful edition include two aloes, five kalanchoes, three legumes and a number of other interesting and enigmatic species such as Protea caffra subsp. caffra, Oldenburgia grandis and Lasiosiphon polycephalus among various others. New taxa published in this volume are Xerophyta burrowsiorum, Kalanchoe ×estrelae, Tephrosia monticola and Barleria makgabengensis. The botanical art include plates by Gillian Condy, Lesley Deysel (with her depiction of Tephrosia monticola featured on the cover), the late F.Z. van der Merwe and Sandra M. Burrows. A guide for authors and artists, and an index to species are also included.

Soft cover. 254 × 191 mm. pp. 224.
ISSN 0015-4504
ISBN 978-1-928224-64-8
Price SADC R503.00

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Vol. 67. Plates 2361–2380 (June 2021)
FPA67 Twenty full-colour plates and descriptions of plants appear in this peer-reviewed biennial series, which has become a collector’s item of the African and specifically South African flora. This volume is dedicated to Prof. Gideon F. Smith, former Chief Director of Research at the South African National Biodiversity Institute and one of South Africa’s most prolific authors of, among other, Old and New World succulents. Contributions to this colourful edition include six Kalanchoe species, two Aloiampelos species, Brunsvigia radulosa, Justicia divaricata and various others. Two new species (Psychotria suber and Carissa sebrabergensis) and four new name combinations (different varieties for Aloiampelos tenuior) are published in this volume. The botanical art include plates by Gillian Condy, Marieta Visagie (with her Adenia repanda featured on the cover), Jenny Hyde-Johnson, Angela Beaumont and Lesley Deysel. A guide for authors and artists, and an index to species are also included. This volume celebrates 100 years of publishing this journal, from 1921 to 2021.

Soft cover, 254 × 191 mm, pp. 220.
ISBN 978-1-928224-48-8
Price SADC R420.00

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Vol. 66. Plates 2341–2360 (June 2019)
FPA66 Twenty full-colour plates and descriptions of plants appear in volume 66, which is dedicated to Gillian [Gill] Condy, SANBI’s recently retired resident botanical artist, in recognition of her passionate and unsurpassed documentation of indigenous flora. Contributions to this colourful edition include Moraea spathulata, Aloidendron barberae (artwork featured on the cover), Protea parvula, Agathosma adenandriflora, Chironia baccifera and Orbea namaquensis. Five new taxa (Cyrtanthus pondoensis Van Jaarsv., Albuca heydenrychii Van Jaarsv., Eucomis sonnetteana N.R.Crouch, Mart.-Azorín; J.E.Burrows, Acanthopsis pagodiformis H.M.Steyn and Senecio voigtii Van Jaars.) are published in this volume. The botanical art is mainly the work of Gillian Condy; other artists who contributed to this volume are Marieta Visagie, Ellaphie Ward-Hilhorst, Angela Beaumont and Daleen Roodt. A guide for authors and artists, and an index to species are also included.

Soft cover. 250 × 190 mm. pp. 183.
ISBN 978-1-928224-32-7
Price: SADC R350.00

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Vol. 65. Plates 2321–2340 (June 2017)
FPA65 Twenty full-colour plates and descriptions of plants appear in volume 65, which is dedicated to Abraham Erasmus [Braam] van Wyk, in recognition of his inspiring teaching, considerable research outputs and substantial community service. Contributions to this colourful edition include Ipomoea bolusiana, Caesalpinia bracteata, Protea namaquana, Gladiolus crassifolius, Aloe braamvanwykii and Codonorhiza azurea. Two new taxa (Esterhuysenia lucilleae and Ruellia kaokoensis) are published in this volume. The botanical art is mainly the work of SANBI resident artist, Gillian Condy; other artists contributing to this volume are Ellaphie Ward-Hilhorst, John Manning, Marieta Visagie and Susan Abraham. A guide for authors and artists, and an index to species are also included.

Soft cover, 254 × 191 mm, pp. 163.
ISBN 978-1-928224-20-4
Price SADC R172.50

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Vol. 64. Plates 2301–2320 (June 2015)
FPA64 Twenty full-colour plates and descriptions of plants appear in this biennial series, which has become a collector’s item of the African and specifically South African flora. This volume is dedicated to Auriol Batten, one of South Africa’s finest botanical artists. Contributions to this colourful edition include Kniphofia caulescens, Aloe succotrina, Adansonia za, Acanthopsis deisperma, Vaccinium exul and Zoutpansbergia caerulea. Three new species (Ceropegia terebriformis, Othonna globosa and O. pumilio) and one new name combination (Curio muirii) are published in this volume. The botanical art is mainly the work of SANBI resident artist, Gillian Condy; other artists contributing to this volume are Mark Fothergill, Marieta Visagie and Sandie Burrows. A guide for authors and artists, and an index to species are also included.

Soft cover, 254 × 191 mm, pp. 172.
ISBN 978-1-928224-03-7
Price SADC R212.75

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Vol. 63. Plates 2281–2300 (June 2013)
FPA63 Twenty full-colour plates and descriptions of plants appear in this biennial series, which has become a collector’s item of the African and specifically South African flora. This volume is dedicated to Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, which celebrates its centenary this year. Contributions to this colourful edition include Erica verticillata, Eulophia ensata, Aloe pavelkae, Gasteria croucheri subsp. pondoensis, Lachenalia pearsonii, Turnera oculata and many more. The botanical art is mainly the work of SANBI resident artist, Gillian Condy; other artists contributing to this volume are Tracy McLellan, Marieta Visagie, Wilna Eloff, Vicki Thomas and Susan Abraham. A guide for authors and artists and an index to species are also included.

Soft cover, pp. 148.
ISBN 978-1-919976-82-2
Price SADC R218.50

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Vol. 62. Plates 2261–2280 (June 2011)
FPA62 This volume is dedicated to Brian J. Huntley and includes, among others, recently described species of Prototulbaghia and Aloe. Other contributions to this colourful edition includes Sclerochiton triacanthus, Ficus sur, Jensenobotrya lossowiana, Millettia grandis, Xysmalobium pedifoetidum, Gladiolus cataractarum, Albuca spiralis and many more. The botanical art is mainly the work of SANBI resident artist, Gillian Condy; other artists contributing to this issue are Jeanette Loedolff, Elise Buitendag, Vicki Thomas, Angela J. Beaumont and Jenny Hyde-Johnson. There is a guide for authors and artists and an index to species.

Soft cover, 250 × 190 mm, pp. 151.
ISBN 978-1-919976-61-7
Price: SADC R218.50

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Vol. 61. Plates 2241–2260 (June 2009)
FPA61 This issue includes, among others, a new species of Thorncroftia, a pineapple lily (Eucomis zambesiaca), a beautiful bulbous plant called sandui (Veltheimia bracteata), Begonia homonyma, a handsome South African species that has been in cultivation for over 150 years, the bladder-nut (Diospyros whyteana) – a fast-growing tree that will thrive in shady gardens in areas with cool or warm summers, the succulent Lavrania haagnerae of northwestern Namibia where it is endemic to the border area between the Damaraland and Kaokoveld regions, Dewinteria petrophila which grows in crevices in granite cliffs of the western Otjihipa Mountains in northwestern Kaokoveld of northern Namibia, and Ixora foliicalyx, a Malagasy tree with beautiful white, sweetly scented flowers. The botanical art is mainly the work of SANBI resident artist, Gillian Condy; other artists contributing to this issue are Barbara Pike, Marieta Visagie, Sibonelo Chiliza, Vicki Thomas and Omer van de Kerckhove. There is a guide for authors and artists and an index to species.

Soft cover, 250 × 190 mm, pp. 154.
ISBN 978-1-919976-50-1
Price: SADC R218.50

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Vol. 60. Plates 2221–2240 (June 2007)
FPA60 This issue includes, among others, a new species of Hypoxis and a new subspecies of Ledebouria ovatifolia, an Ornithogalum from sheer cliff faces in the Eastern Cape, a beautiful yellow arum lily, two gingers called Siphonochilus kirkii and Costus afer, the parasite Viscum crassulae and the mangrove Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Also included are two pelargoniums and Stenostelma umbelluliferum, which was re-discovered after more than 100 years. The botanical art is mainly the work of SANBI resident artist, Gillian Condy; other artists contributing to this issue are Tamlin Blake, Angela Beaumont, Auriol Batten, Elsa Pooley and Sibonelo Chiliza. There is a guide for authors and artists and an index to species.

Soft cover, 250 × 190 mm, pp. 144.
ISBN 978-1-919976-34-1
Price: SADC R218.50

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SANBI Biodiversity Series

This series publishes occasional reports on projects, technologies, workshops, symposia and other activities initiated by, or executed in partnership with, SANBI.
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No. 31: Early botanical exploration in the Kaokoveld (northwestern Namibia) 1957
BioSeries 31 O.A. Leistner (2022)

This book gives an account of the first impressions and collections of two adventurous South African botanists who travelled to the remote northwesternmost corner of Namibia (then South West Africa) in 1957. Otto Leistner and Bernard de Winter (1924–2017) set off on a journey of three months from Pretoria to the Kaokoveld, returning with 845 collected specimens (of which 32 turned out to be new to science) and a lifetime’s worth of memories.

They had no detailed maps of the region, there were no standardised place names. They measured their distances in miles and their precious fuel reserves in gallons. They had no radio at their disposal. They wrote their letters on paper and, where possible, asked someone to take them to a post office 400 km away. They put films in their cameras and sent them away to be developed. Computers were as big as a house, and GPS was a twinkle in the eyes of science fiction writers.

The story takes the armchair botanist on an enterprising journey to a historically underexplored region and provides a snapshot in time of the beautiful region. In diary format, the reader is presented with tales of high adventure, encounters with lions and elephants, mechanical mishaps in the wilderness, and descriptions of this exquisite landscape and its associated vegetation and botanical treasures. From Ohopoho (now Opuwo), the explorers undertake five journeys in different directions to gain a better understanding of the region’s natural history. Herero plant names are documented, and detailed botanical notes with local uses of plants and species lists are also included.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 168.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-47-1.
Price SADC R396.00

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No. 30: Research plan for plant taxonomy 2020–2030
BioSeries30 J.E. Victor (2021)

Taxonomic research includes the science of taxonomy and classification, and involves discovering, naming, describing and classifying biological organisms. This information is published in a variety of ways on different platforms. At SANBI, the Foundational Biodiversity Science (FBS) division is positioned at the base layer of the institute’s research value chain, providing foundational taxonomic information for all fields of biodiversity research. Seven strategic objectives to lead the discovery and expansion of knowledge of southern African plant diversity are discussed, and form the programmes of activity for taxonomy for the next five years.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 24.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-46-4.
ONLY AVAILABLE IN PDF FORMAT

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No. 29: Guidelines for collecting living plant specimens from the field
BioSeries29 N. Mabuya, A. Hankey, L. Zondi, R. Riddles, D. Dibakwane, M. Gabayi, C. Viljoen, B. Festus, R. Malatji, R. Oliver & M. Nndanduleni (2019)

This illustrated plant collecting guide is a manual aimed at horticulturists to supply basic information and guidelines on conducting fieldwork for living plant collection. The different aspects described include trip planning, plant collection, data collection and handling of plant material. The combination of theory and some practical experience will equip the reader with the essential knowledge required to successfully conduct plant collection from the field.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 44.
ISBN 978-1-928224-37-2
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No. 28: Guidelines for mapping wetlands in South Africa
BioSeries28 N. Job, N. Mbona, A. Dayaram & D. Kotze (2018)

Wetlands provide important ecosystem services in both rural and developed parts of South Africa, but are one of the country’s most threatened habitats. Therefore, there is a need to understand, conserve and restore them. Repeatable standards and accurate methods for collecting data can help achieve these goals. The purpose of this manual is to act as a resource to all wetland practitioners so that data collected can contribute to national and local projects through a standard and strategic process. This manual is a tool for wetland practitioners, at all levels, to improve procedures for mapping wetlands using a set of standards for data collection and storage, so that data feeds into national level databases such as the National Wetland Inventory, and informs national policy tools such as National Freshwater Ecosystem Priority Areas.

The manual begins with an explanation of what a wetland is, and the different types of wetlands that one may encounter in the South African landscape. It then outlines an approach for designing a wetland mapping project and capturing data that has been tested and refined by several experts in the discipline. This section is followed by tips on recognising, digitising and classifying wetlands and human impacts on wetlands from desktop imagery and in the field. Examples of wetlands that have been mapped and classified are provided with searchable co-ordinates to enable the user to locate the wetland using a geobrowser such as Google Earth and further explore it from various angles. Several additional tools such as datasheets and checklists are provided. A step by step guide to basic delineation using free and licensed mapping software is shared in the appendices.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 100.
ISBN 978-1-928224-23-5
Price SADC R115.00

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No. 27: Gardens for the nation: 1994–2014. Serving and supporting South Africa’s social and economic development for 20 years
BioSeries27 Compiled by C. Willis (2015)

South Africa’s national botanical gardens, with the support of government, non-governmental organisations, corporates and civil society over the past 20 years (1994–2014), have, and will continue, to serve as urban-based windows into South Africa’s biodiversity. As nature-based tourism destinations, South Africa’s national botanical gardens have supported local communities and provided education, recreational, research and work opportunities to thousands of South Africans and international visitors.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 78.
ISBN 978-1-928224-07-5
Price SADC R86.25

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No. 26: Strategy for plant taxonomic research in South Africa 2015–2020
BioSeries26 J.E. Victor, G.F. Smith & A.E. van Wyk (2015)

This document addresses primarily the plant taxonomic research in South Africa, but includes discussions on herbarium collections and associated data, capacity for conducting research, and implementation of the strategy. During the development of this Strategy, the authors consulted taxonomists from most universities of South Africa, as well as abroad (Royal Botanic Gardens Kew, Missouri Botanical Garden, and University of Zurich), to share, and where appropriate, incorporate views beneficial to strategy development and implementation in South Africa. The vision of the strategy is to document and provide predictive classifications for South African plant species, enabling users to identify and access knowledge about them, so that all can understand, conserve and benefit from biodiversity.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 44.
ISBN 978-1-928224-09-9
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No. 25: SANBI Herbaria: a decade of foundational botanical excellence and collections management (2004–2014)
BioSeries25 M.S. Mothogoane, R.R. Klopper, C.N. Cupido, E. Josias, M.A. Mothapo, A.M. Ngwenya, N. Phaliso, J.A. Ready, M.S. Serumula, Y. Singh & E. Van Wyk (2015)

There exists a need to promote the value of natural science collections, and to have a strategic approach to their expansion, use and application. This requires reflection on the past to understand how the collections were established and how they have been used, a critical assessment of the current situation and planning for the future. This booklet celebrates the achievements over the past ten years, recognising the historical aspects of SANBI’s collections. Looking ahead, the importance of research, herbarium services and herbarium specimen collections as a source of information is highlighted.

Soft cover, A5. pp 44.
ISBN 978-1-928224-01-3
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No. 24: Wasps and bees of southern Africa
BioSeries24 S.K. Gess & F.W. Gess (2014)

In order to maintain essential populations of organisms, be they plant or animal, it is necessary to have an understanding of their requirements. In this work, the authors have compiled all that is known for southern Africa of the biology of wasps and bees, important pollinators and predators, and have shown how agricultural land use and coastal development impact on the diversity of wasps and bees. The principal focus is the semi-arid to arid areas – the authors’ main study areas over the past 40 years. The work is intended for all who are interested in natural history, conservation and farming, and as a starting point for further observations and research.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 320.
ISBN 978-1-919976-73-0
Price SADC R402.50

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No. 23: A biosystematics research strategy for the Algae, Animals, Bacteria and Archaea, Fungi and Plants of South Africa 2013–2018
BioSeries23 J.E. Victor, M. Hamer & G.F. Smith (2013)

Research in the fields of taxonomy and biosystematics is fundamental to all other biodiversity research, including conservation biology, agriculture and sustainable use. Following wide consultation, this Strategy for Biosystematics Research in South Africa, the first comprehensive one covering all the major biota occurring in the country, was produced by the South African National Biodiversity Institute. The Strategy provides clear guidelines to taxonomic researchers and funding agencies regarding where research effort and resources should be focused over the 2013–2018 period to produce maximum benefits to society.

Soft cover, A5. pp 44.
ISBN 978-1-919976-90-7
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No. 22: Classification system for wetlands and other aquatic ecosystems in South Africa. User manual: Inland Systems
BioSeries22 D. Ollis, K. Snaddon, N. Job & N. Mbona (2013)

This user manual (compiled by the Freshwater Consulting Group) aims to provide user-friendly guidance for application of the classification system to inland aquatic ecosystems of South Africa. The manual has been produced in a format that can be used in the field and is designed to appeal to a wide range of user-groups, including both non-specialists and experts. The types of inland systems, and basis and overall structure of the classification system are clearly explained. The various spatial scales (regional setting, landscape setting, hydrogeomorphic unit, hydrological regime and descriptors) are discussed in detail with notes on the application of the classification system. A glossary of important terms and a series of dichotomous keys for the classification of inland systems are included to facilitate consistent classification of inland aquatic ecosystems throughout the country. Worked examples of how to apply the classification system are also provided.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 124.
ISBN 978-1-919976-75-4
Price SADC R46.00

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No. 21: Water dancers of South Africa’s National Botanical Gardens. An illustrated dragonfly and damselfly checklist
BioSeries21 C.K. Willis & M.J. Samways (compilers) (2011)

After birds, butterflies and bees, dragonflies and damselflies are among the most conspicuous groups of animals observed in South Africa’s national botanical gardens. They are particularly prevalent around rivers, streams, dams and other aquatic habitats. The title of this book – water dancers – is a literal translation of the Zulu word ‘jigamanzi’ that has been used to describe dragonflies, an apt description as adults swirl about water bodies engaged in their daily business. Part of the reason for publishing this illustrated checklist is to create greater public awareness and appreciation of the importance and value of conserving dragonfly diversity as a valuable component of our natural habitats and ecosystems, as dragonflies serve as excellent indicators of terrestrial and aquatic environmental change. Not only are dragonflies good indicators of environmental health and ecological integrity, they also act as flagship species for other aquatic invertebrates in the biodiversity debate. This book represents the third in a series of Sappi-sponsored illustrated checklists of biodiversity recorded in South Africa’s national botanical gardens.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 108.
ISBN 978-1-919976-68-6
Price SADC R46.00

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No. 20: Fundraising and marketing tools for biodiversity conservation and development projects
BioSeries20 Cape Action for People and the Environment (compilers) (2011)

The majority of people working in the field of biodiversity conservation, whether paid or voluntarily, generally have backgrounds in the natural sciences, or do so due to their passion for sustaining and conserving all life forms. They rarely have experience in fundraising, and with an estimated 110 000 non-profit organisations (NPOs) in South Africa, the competition for donated money is tough, especially in times of global recession. This book follows the real flow of marketing and fundraising processes: from the setting-up of a new biodiversity conservation organisation, project identification and potential donor research, to planning as broad an income base as possible. This book provides a guide through the key steps in fundraising and marketing. Where practical and applicable, experiences and advice from established organisations active in biodiversity conservation are provided.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 104.
ISBN 978-1-919976-67-9
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No. 19: Ensuring a future for South Africa’s frogs: a strategy for conservation research
BioSeries19 G.J. Measy (ed.) (2011)

South Africa, particularly the eastern part of the country, is home to a spectacular diversity of frogs (order Anura). However, the very survival of many species is in danger due to various factors causing habitat loss. This book represents the outcomes of a reassessment of all threatened species – roughly a third of all South African frogs. Strategic research priorities regarding taxonomy, conservation, monitoring and public awareness are extensively covered and guidelines for all future amphibian studies are established. Appendix 1 provides an update of the Red List with IUCN criteria for all reassessed amphibians. The species accounts are illustrated with maps and images and contain detailed information on every species’ geographic range, population, habitat, ecology as well as current and historical Red List status. Further information includes notes on conservation actions currently in place and major threats to their survival. This book is a must-have for all conservationists, policy makers and amphibian or natural history enthusiasts.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 84.
ISBN 978-1-919976-63-1
Price SADC R69.00

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No. 18: Pollen wasps and flowers in southern Africa
BioSeries18 S.K. Gess & F.W. Gess (2010)

Pollen wasps are different to other wasps as, like bees, they provision their nests with pollen and nectar, rather than with hunted insects and spiders, as other wasps do. Western southern Africa is particularly rich in pollen wasps where they are important as flower pollinators, and they have interesting and close associations with the plants visited. This book covers world distribution, southern African distribution, morphology, taxonomy, life history (including behaviour), as well as associated organisms of these wasps and presently recognised species. The sections on behaviour include: flower visiting, water visiting, nesting, nest provisioning, sleeping and sheltering, and male behaviour. Details of the various 21 plant families visited are given, and there is a section on the impact of land use practices on pollen wasps. Colour photographs of the genera, flowers and vegetation types are provided, and line drawings depict the various nest types and distribution maps. This publication will interest entomologists, conservationists, ecologists, botanists, as well as amateurs wanting to know more about these insects.

Soft cover, A4. 147 pp.
ISBN 978-1-919976-60-0
Price SADC R92.00

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No. 17: Environmental and Resource Economics Conference Synthesis Report. Environment & Economy: Mind the Gap
BioSeries17 A. Nahman (compiler) (2010)

This synthesis report came about through a collaborative effort that started with the decision to stage a national conference on Environmental Resource Economics in Cape Town, May 2009. After the Cape Action for People and the Environment (C.A.P.E.) Resource Economics Task Team decided to lead the process of staging the event, partnerships were quickly formed with others keen to contribute. The objectives of this report are: 1. To review and document the progress, current status and future trends with regard to ERE research and development in SA; 2. To collate and document the outcomes of the conference with regard to implementation, including that which focused on Payments for Ecosystem Services and other key topics in the field; and 3. To understand the key areas within ERE that should reward future effort and investment, particularly from an implementation perspective.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 26.
ISBN 978-1-919976-62-4
Price SADC R46.00

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No. 16: Butterflies of South Africa’s National Botanical Gardens: an illustrated checklist
BioSeries16 C. Willis & S. Woodhall (2010)

Butterflies have formed one of the more visible, but not always noticed components of the biodiversity of South Africa’s national botanical gardens since Kirstenbosch was established in 1913. This consolidated checklist of the butterflies found in the (then) nine botanical gardens of the South African National Botanical Institute is a first attempt to provide a comprehensive list of butterflies known to occur in each of the national botanical gardens. Information was supplied by university students and members of the Lepidopterists’ Society of Africa (LepSoc). English and Afrikaans common names, scientific names, wingspan, some notes of behaviour and flight period and a photograph are provided for each butterfly presented. There is also an indication of which national botanical gardens the species has been found in.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 238.
ISBN 978-1-919976-57-0
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No. 15: The introduced terrestrial Mollusca of South Africa
BioSeries15 D.G. Herbert (2010)

The alien terrestrial mollusc fauna of South Africa is comprehensively reviewed in this publication. A total of 34 species are considered to have been introduced to the country, of which 28 are considered established and 13 of these invasive. The history of introduction and recording is summarised and patterns of introduction are analysed. Each species is discussed in terms of its distinguishing features, habitat preferences, date of introduction and first record, native range and global distribution, distribution in South Africa, pest status, and similarity with indigenous species. Further taxonomic notes and biological observations relating to behaviour, reproduction and parasite transmission are included where relevant. In addition, some consideration is given to potentially pestiferous species, which are not yet known to occur in South Africa, but which represent a significant future introduction risk of levelling off.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 108.
ISBN 978-1-919976- 56-3
Price SADC R57.50

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No. 13: South African Red Data Book: Butterflies
BioSeries13 G.A. Henning, R.F. Terblanche & J.B. Ball (eds) (2009)

This publication, produced in cooperation with the Lepidopterists’ Society of Africa, fulfils the need for a revised South African Red Data Book for butterflies as well as for an improved proposed Red List of butterflies in South Africa. It highlights the presence of threatened species, provides a rationale for the listing of such taxa, and then identifies the actual threats facing these butterfly species. A review of the ecology of each species, if known, is given, enabling appropriate conservation action to be directed towards these threats. Research priorities that promote conservation management strategies for the species are also identified. A most useful tool for students, workers, managers, and decision-makers in conservation-related fields.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 158.
ISBN 978-1-919976-51-8
Price SADC R69.00

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No. 12: Amphibians of the Taita Hills
BioSeries12 G.J. Measey, P.K. Malonza & V. Muchai (2009)

This book describes the amphibians (frogs) of the Taita Hills in south-eastern Kenya. It will help demystify what amphibians are, and their importance in conservation, as well as make readers aware of the importance of their environment, especially the indigenous forest upon which they depend. Included in the book is information on the biodiversity and the climate (temperature and rainfall) of the area. Each species account has a graph depicting the different months of the year that the frogs call, eggs and tadpoles hatch, and the adult phase. It also shows where to find them, their size (compared to a human hand), and has a coloured photograph of the species. The book is in two languages (English one half, and Swahili the other half).

Soft cover, A5, pp. 75.
ISBN 978-1-919976-49-5
Price SADC R115.00

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No. 11: Monitoring and evaluation: tools for biodiversity conservation and development projects
BioSeries11 Cape Action for People and the Environment (compilers) (2008)

This is the second in a series of project management handbooks, and deals with monitoring and evaluation (M&E). It is aimed at people working in the biodiversity conservation sector and focuses on a particular set of activities integral to the process of project implementation. These are the activities that make up project monitoring and evaluation, and what is associated with it: clear objectives, a particular form of support or intervention, a set time frame, a defined target group and beneficiaries. It aims to provide you with an overview of some of the key issues in project M&E, a guiding framework within which you can develop your M&E plans, and tools, concepts and exercises to build your own M&E practice.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 126.
ISBN 978-1-919976-47-1
Price SADC R57.50

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No. 10: User profiles for the South African offshore environment
BioSeries10 L. Atkinson & K. Sink (2008)

This document was commissioned by the Offshore Marine Protected Areas, South African National Biodiversity Institute, World Wildlife Fund and the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, to serve as an overview of existing information pertaining to offshore marine resource users of South Africa’s exclusive economic zone. It outlines petroleum activities, mineral prospecting and mining, commercial fishing, shipping, dumping of waste, submarine cables, naval activities and scientific research in the offshore zone; giving background information, history, general operation and the areas of activity. Known and potential biodiversity impacts as well as overlap and issues of conflict between various resource users are also identified.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 66.
ISBN 978-1-919976-43-3
Price SADC R34.50

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No. 9: Guidelines for Offshore Marine Protected Areas in South Africa
BioSeries09 K. Sink & C. Attwood (2008)

The Offshore Marine Protected Areas (OMPA) project aims to facilitate the establishment of a protected offshore area with broad support from the various offshore sectors. It will span three years, and will develop objectives and guidelines for the establishment of these areas, collate scientific data and other information, and identify priority areas for protection. This document specifically addresses the guidelines for the establishment of offshore protected areas, and is aimed at the government departments using marine resources, industry stakeholders such as fishing, mining, petroleum, shipping, waste disposal and marine research, as well as the general public.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 18.
ISBN 978-1-919976-43-3
Price SADC R23.00

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No. 8: Bird Checklist for South Africa’s National Botanical Gardens
BioSeries08 C. Willis, O. Curtis & M. Anderson (2008)

This publication of a bird checklist for South Africa’s National Botanical Gardens is the first in a series of SANBI publications to be produced in collaboration with Sappi. The checklist covers birds occurring in nine of the national botanical gardens in South Africa, and apart from the common names of birds (old and new) and scientific names, it includes information such as the endemic status of the birds, their movements and migration habits, and their threat status. Birds recorded in each garden are listed in dedicated columns, with open circles that can be filled in by visitors when birds are seen in a particular garden. Colour photographs of some of the birds are also included.

Soft cover, A4 ring-bound, pp. 40.
ISBN 978-1-919976-41-9
Price SADC R23.00

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No. 7: Project planning: tools for biodiversity conservation and development projects
BioSeries07 Cape Action for People and the Environment (compilers) (2007)

This is the first in a series of three handbooks that will form part of the C.A.P.E. Partners Toolbox and that will guide project developers and other practitioners through the full project cycle. The C.A.P.E. handbooks are modelled on the Olive series (by Olive Publications), but are adapted for application in the C.A.P.E. context and included relevant, actual case studies that characterise the efforts of C.A.P.E. partners in building capacity that will result in benefits to biodiversity and the communities of the Cape Floristic Region.

Soft-cover, A4, pp. vi + 73.
ISBN 978-1-919976-37-2
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No. 6: Invasive alien flora and fauna in South Africa: expertise and bibliography
BioSeries06 C.F. Musil & I.A.W. MacDonald (2007)

This inventory arose as an outcome of an earlier national survey sponsored by the Southern African Biodiversity Support Programme aimed at determining user needs in the field of alien invasive species management and research.

Soft cover, A4. pp 176.
ISBN 978-1-919976-35-8
Price SADC R92.00

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No. 5: A plan for phylogenetic studies of southern African reptiles: proceedings of a workshop held at Kirstenbosch, February 2006
BioSeries05 W.R. Branch, K.A. Tolley, M. Cunningham, A.M. Bauer, G. Alexander, J.A. Harrison, A.A. Turner & M.F. Bates (2006)

The Southern African Reptile Conservation Assessment (SARCA) was launched in May 2005. Its primary aim is to produce a conservation assessment of the reptiles of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland over a four-year period (2005–2009). It has the distinction of being the first faunal project of the newly constituted South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) which, previously – as the National Botanical Institute (NBI) – was concerned only with plants. This report brings together a comprehensive set of guidelines for a whole section of southern Africa’s biodiversity research, and should remain relevant for at least a decade. Areas under study include priorities for systematic studies on southern African reptiles; taxonomic units relevant to conservation planning; mismatches between morphology and genetics; methods, techniques and protocols for phylogenetic studies on southern African reptiles; and a sampling and implementation strategy for phylogenetic studies on southern African reptiles.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 48.
ISBN 1-919976-33-7
Price SADC R57.50

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No. 4: Fynbos Fynmense: people making biodiversity work
BioSeries04 A. Ashwell, T. Sandwith, M. Barnett, A. Parker & F. Wisani (2006)

This publication illustrates the results achieved on the ground and the lessons learnt as a result of the Cape Action for People and the Environment (C.A.P.E.) programme. Topics covered include: Introducing C.A.P.E.; Unleashing the potential of protected areas; Managing watershed wisely; Enabling conservation stewardship; Building the biodiversity economy; Supporting conservation education; Strengthening institutions; Co-ordinating C.A.P.E.; and Looking ahead.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 263.
ISBN 1-919976-29-9
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Strelitzia

This series publishes original, peer-reviewed scientific research on various aspects of botanical diversity.
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No. 46: Flowering plant families of southern Africa
Strelitzia46 M. Koekemoer, H.M. Steyn & S.P. Bester (2023)

This publication is the first of its kind for the region and aims to introduce users to the extent of our flora by providing accounts of all 242 currently recognised, indigenous and naturalised, flowering plant families in the southern Africa region. Getting to know such a large flora is a daunting task and one of the first steps in plant identification is to know which family they belong to. Included in the book are: a pictorial introductory guide to plant families, complete accounts of all flowering plant families of southern Africa introducing users to well-known and lesser-known families, species richness maps for each family, a diagnostic page for each family consisting of photographs depicting their diagnostic characters, representative species for each family (±4 500 images), and images of many lesser-known species that have never been published before. This totals over 800 pages filled with botanical information. It is a standard reference work on the flowering plant families of southern Africa and intended for everyone interested in plants.

Hard cover, 308 × 217 mm, pp. 850.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-60-0
Price SADC R1 145.80

Please contact the Bookshop (sanbibookshop@sanbi.org.za) to request a free copy of the PDF.

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No. 45: A taxonomic revision of the genus Zyrphelis (Asteraceae, Astereae) in South Africa
Strelitzia 45 P.P.J. Herman & U. Zinnecker-Wiegand (2022)

A taxonomic account of the endemic genus Zyrphelis in South Africa is presented. The genus Gymnostephium is sunk under Zyrphelis and some taxa previously listed under Mairia moved to Zyrphelis. Twenty-one species (total 35 taxa) are recognised. Zyrphelis ciliaris subsp. hirsuta is elevated to species level, Z. gracilis is reduced to varietal level under Z. fruticosa, Z. grauii is reduced to varietal level under Z. montana, Z. monticola is sunk under Z. microcephala subsp. microcephala. The following new subspecies and varieties are described: Z. decumbens var. grandis, Z. ecklonis subsp. longipedunculata, Z. foliosa var. glabra, Z. fruticosa var. pilosa, Z. lasiocarpa var. minor, Z. pilosella var. glandulifolia, and Z. taxifolia var. robusta. The following names are lectotypified here: Felicia monticola, Gymnostephium leve, Mairia foliosa, M. lasiocarpa and M. montana. Keys to the species, subspecies and varieties, full descriptions of all the taxa, distribution maps and illustrations are provided.

Soft cover, 180 240 mm, pp. 256.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-55-6
Price SADC R497.95

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No. 44: Photographic guide to the wild flowers of the Limpopo Province
Strelitzia44 S. Kremer-Köhne (2021)

This easy-to-use photographic field guide presents wild flowers occurring in the southern African summer rainfall area, with a focus on the Limpopo Province. The guide contains a total of 90 families, 343 genera and 770 species. The selection covers both frequently seen and less common plant species. Technical botanical terms are kept to a minimum and a glossary explains those that have been used.

Soft cover, 190 × 255 mm, pp. 372.
ISBN 978-1-928224-53-2
Price SADC R575.00

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No. 43: A monograph on the genus Cliffortia
Strelitzia43 C.M. Whitehouse (2021)

Cliffortia L. (Rosaceae), is one of the ten largest plant genera in the Cape Floristic Region (CFR). It extends beyond the CFR northwards to Namaqualand and eastwards through the Drakensberg, with two species extending into tropical Africa. The genus represents a variety growth forms that is rarely matched by other genera within the CFR, from ericoid shrubs to small trees, low, sprawling, semi-herbaceous ground covers and impenetrable, dense tangled thickets. All species are wind pollinated and there is little morphological variation in the flowers. Species differentiation within Cliffortia is based primarily upon vegetative characters and fruit morphology as opposed to pollination-driven characters. Some species require their roots to be constantly surrounded by water, while others exist in rock crevices of mountains on the arid edge of the Karoo.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 484.
ISBN 978-1-928224-44-0
Price SADC R713.00

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No. 42: Iridaceae of southern Africa
Strelitzia42 P. Goldblatt & J.C. Manning (2020)

This is the first complete taxonomic treatment for Iridaceae in southern Africa (including Botswana, Lesotho, Namibia, South Africa and Eswatini) since the publication of J.G. Baker’s account in Flora capensis (1896). It treats a total of 1 210 species in 36 genera, classified in the four subfamilies Aristeoideae (Aristea 46 spp.), Nivenioideae (Nivenia 11 spp., Klattia 3 spp. and Witsenia 1 sp.), Crocoideae tribe Tritoniopsideae (Tritoniopsis 23 spp.), tribe Watsonieae (Watsonia 53 spp., Pillansia 1 sp., Thereianthus 11 spp., Micranthus 7 spp., Codonorhiza 7 spp., Schizorhiza 1 sp., Lapeirousia 27 spp. and Afrosolen 11 spp.) and tribe Ixieae subtribes Gladiolinae (Gladiolus 169 spp.), Melasphaerulinae (Melasphaerula 1 sp.), Freesiinae (Xenoscapa 3 spp., Freesia 16 spp., Crocosmia 7 spp. and Devia 1 sp.), Hesperanthinae (Geissorhiza 104 spp. and Hesperantha 87 spp.), Tritoniinae (Babiana 93 spp., Chasmanthe 3 spp., Sparaxis 16 spp., Duthiastrum 1 sp., Dierama 37 spp., Tritonia 30 spp. and Ixia 100 spp.), subtribe Radinosiphoninae (Radinosiphon 2 spp.) and Crocinae (Romulea 84 spp., Afrocrocus 1 sp. and Syringodea. 7 spp.), and Iridoideae (Dietes 5 spp., Bobartia 17 spp., Ferraria 15 spp. and Moraea 209 spp.). A revised, phylogeny-based tribal and subtribal classification is presented here for Crocoideae, correlating with corm ontogeny and seed characteristics. Keys are provided to subfamilies, tribes and genera (and in the case of larger genera to subgenera or sections) as well as to species and infraspececific taxa. Each species is fully described with complete nomenclature, geographic range and a distribution map. Genera are illustrated with line drawings, and nearly half of the species are illustrated with colour photographs. Four new species are described, Bobartia vlokii Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, Geissorhiza adriaanii Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, Hesperantha mtamvunae Goldblatt & J.C.Manning and Romulea fuscomontana Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, and a number of names are synonymised.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 1 168.
ISBN 978-1-928224-35-8
Price SADC R1 236.25

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No. 41: A Flora of the Eastern Cape Province
Strelitzia41 C.L. Bredenkamp (2019)

A Flora of the Eastern Cape Province is a comprehensive book, the first to describe the vascular plants occurring in the Eastern Cape Province. From an evolutionary perspective, this flora evolved during the formation of the Karoo Supergroup and reached a phase of maturity in the latter half of the Cretaceous. Geology and soils, together with climate, form the basis for the existence of plants and animals, a symbiosis that can rightfully be described as a symphony. The introduction to the Flora leads the reader through the 12 bioregions and the lustre thereof is reflected in the twelve accompanying photographic plates. A broad perspective of the bioregions in the Eastern Cape is provided by Prof. Richard Cowling in the chapter Vegetation of the Eastern Cape: navigating a transition zone. This Flora contains descriptions of all families (226), genera (1 440) and species (6 611) occurring in the Eastern Cape Province, compiled by 77 contributors, of whom many are specialists on specific taxa.

Hard cover, 170 × 255 mm, pp. 2 208.
ISBN 978-1-928224-28-0
Prices SADC:
Volume 1 – R524.40
Volume 2 – R480.70
Volume 3 – R416.30
Full set – R1 380.00

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No. 40: Systematics of Drimia Jacq. (Hyacinthaceae: Urgineoideae) in southern Africa
Strelitzia40 J.C. Manning & P. Goldblatt (2018)

A taxonomic revision of the genus Drimia in southern Africa, in which we recognise 70 species with 61 endemic to the region. The account includes the new combination D. basutica for the illegitimate D. angustifolia Baker (1897) plus additional combinations for names that were invalidly published. Also described are eight new species: D. barbata, D. ciliolata, D. decipiens, D. juncifolia, D. khubusensis, D. monophylla and D. schizobasoides from the Greater Cape Floristic Region, and D. vespertina from northern Namibia and southern Angola. Four taxa are synonymised: Albuca reflexa is included in D. indica, D. loedolffiae in D. calcarata, D. saniensis in D. depressa, and D. macrocarpa in D. basutica; and D. ecklonii is recognised as an earlier name for D. ligulata. Drimia nitida is confirmed as the earliest name for Ledebouria concolor (Baker) Jessop and the necessary new combination and synonymy in Ledebouria is provided. A detailed infrageneric classification for southern African Drimia is provided in which 19 morphologically coherent sections diagnosed by a combination of traditional and novel characters is recognised. The account includes full species descriptions, notes on ecology, distribution maps and identification keys to the sections and species, and line drawings of almost half of the species.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 180.
ISBN 978-1-928224-25-9
Price SADC R230.00

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No. 39: A taxonomic revision of Calobota (Fabaceae, Crotalarieae)
Strelitzia39 J.S. Boatwright, P.M. Tilney & B.-E. van Wyk (2018)

A taxonomic revision of the genus Calobota Eckl. & Zeyh. (Fabaceae, Crotalarieae) is presented. Sixteen species are recognised in the genus. Among these, Calobota namibensis Boatwr. & B.-E.van Wyk is described as new from southwestern Namibia. The anatomy of the leaves, stems and fruit walls was studied and revealed important characters to distinguish Calobota from other genera of the tribe Crotalarieae. These include isobilateral leaves (palisade parenchyma both adaxially and abaxially) as opposed to dorsiventral leaves (e.g. in Wiborgia Thunb. and Wiborgiella Boatwr. & B.-E.van Wyk), and thick-walled fruit with gelatinous fibres in some species. The absence of mucilage cells in the epidermis of the leaves is also an important distinguishing character for the genus with respect to Aspalathus L., Lebeckia Thunb., Rafnia Thunb., Wiborgia and Wiborgiella. Calobota differs from other closely related genera in the tribe in the following combination of characters: late bark formation, uni- or trifoliolate to simple, laminar leaves, hairy petals (C. cuspidosa (Burch.) Boatwr. & B.-E.van Wyk and C. psiloloba (E.Mey.) Boatwr. & B.-E.van Wyk are exceptions), anther configuration of 4+5+1 and laterally compressed or terete, usually pubescent pods. A detailed taxonomic study of the genus is presented here, including a key to the species, descriptions, typifications, distributions, phylogenetic relationships and illustrations.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 100.
ISBN 978-1-928224-27-3
Price SADC R80.50

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No. 38: Plants of the Free State: inventory and identification guide
Strelitzia38 E. Retief & N.L. Meyer (2017)

Plants of the Free State: inventory and identification guide seeks to assist in the identification of plants, to provide essential information as well as pleasure and to stimulate and promote an interest in the plants of the Free State. It is aimed at professional botanists, nature conservationists, students, amateur botanists and informed laymen. The three largest families in the region are the Asteraceae, Poaceae and Fabaceae. Family descriptions, keys to the relevant genera in a family, keys to the species of genera and species descriptions are provided. Descriptions include habit, height, distinguishing characters, flowering time, habitat, common names and distribution in the region according to six subregions. A comprehensive, illustrated glossary concludes this treatise.

Hard cover, 170 × 255 mm, pp. 1 246.
ISBN 978-1-928224-15-0
Price SADC R632.50

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No. 37: Beeplants of South Africa: sources of nectar, pollen, honeydew and propolis for honeybees
Strelitzia37 M.F. Johannsmeier (2016)

While the crop grower is reliant on the beekeeper for the pollination service his honeybees provide during the flowering season, the beekeeper in turn depends on variable forage resources and habitats to sustain his honeybee colonies throughout the year, and to provide him with a honey crop. Beeplants of South Africa: sources of nectar, pollen, honeydew and propolis for honeybees attempts to furnish beekeepers with information on the nectar and pollen value of South African beeplants, whether indigenous or exotic, grown in orchards or plantations, or whether ornamentals or weeds. Additionally, flowering times are documented and the pollination needs of crop plants are addressed.

The applicable beeplant values can assist gardeners, farmers, beekeepers, or practitioners in environmental impact assessments or rehabilitation projects, in deciding which plants to utilise, conserve or grow for multi-purpose usage. This book contributes to the outcomes of the Global Pollination Project and the Honeybee Forage Project, both implemented by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI). It contains an extensive index to the scientific as well as English and Afrikaans common names used in the publication.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 556.
ISBN 978-1-928224-17-4
Price SADC R1 224.75

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No. 36: Identification guide to the southern African grasses. An identification manual with keys, descriptions and distributions
Strelitzia36 L. Fish, A.C., Mashau, M.J. Moeaha & M.T. Nembudani (2015)

This identification guide to grasses of southern Africa relies primarily on the use of keys and descriptive information to aid the used in identifying grass species. It contains some of the best information needed to identify southern African grasses. Keys to grass genera and species are provided, and in some instances also to easily confused taxa. For each species, a combination of useful characters is provided, and where applicable, line drawings of the spikelet or parts thereof accompany the identification key and description. Species descriptions and distribution maps are important and add to the identification of grasses. One or more line drawings or a scanned herbarium specimen accompany the description of each genus known to occur in southern Africa. Anatomy vouchers and voucher specimens are listed for each species discussed.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 807.
ISBN 978-1-928224-00-6
Price SADC R575.00

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No. 35: Systematics and biology of Lapeirousia, Codonorhiza, Psilosiphon and Schizorhiza in southern Africa
Strelitzia35 P. Goldblatt & J.C. Manning (2015)

Plastid and nuclear DNA sequence analyses show that the sub-Saharan African genus Lapeirousia Pourr. is paraphyletic as presently circumscribed. Species of Lapeirousia are retrieved as a clade in which are nested the tropical African genera Cyanixia Goldblatt & J.C.Manning and Savannosiphon Goldblatt & Marais as sister to Lapeirousia sect. Paniculatae Goldblatt plus the taxonomically isolated L. neglecta Goldblatt. To preserve taxonomic monophyly we dismember Lapeirousia, recognising the new genera Codonorhiza Goldblatt & J.C.Manning for L. sect. Fastigiatae Goldblatt (7 spp.) and Schizorhiza Goldblatt & J.C.Manning (1 sp.) for L. neglecta, both from the Cape Floristic Region, as well as Psilosiphon Welw. ex Goldblatt & J.C.Manning (15 spp.) for L. sect. Paniculatae, all from tropical and eastern southern Africa. This leaves Lapeirousia (27 species) centred in western southern Africa, but also represented in south tropical Africa. We revise the infrageneric taxonomy of Lapeirousia in light of the molecular phylogeny, recognising sect. Chasmatocallis (R.C.Foster) Goldblatt & J.C.Manning, sect. Lapeirousia and sect. Sophronia (Licht. ex Roem. & Schult.) Goldblatt & J.C.Manning. We provide dichotomous keys to the four genera in southern Africa and full revisions of all four genera. Six new species, two of Codonorhiza, three of Lapeirousia and one Psilosiphon are recognised; two subspecies are raised to species rank, and L. angustifolia Schltr., currently included in L. pyramidalis (Lam.) Goldblatt, is also recognised at species rank. Four new subspecies are described.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 151.
ISBN 978-1-928224-02-0
Price SADC R201.25

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No. 34: The Apocynaceae of Namibia
Strelitzia34 P.V. Bruyns (2014)

The Flora of Namibia is dominated by the families Poaceae, Asteraceae and Fabaceae. Here, an account of the Apocynaceae, the seventh largest family in Namibia, is presented. A total of 153 species belonging to 46 genera are recorded as occurring naturally for the country and 19 of these species are endemic to Namibia, with two endemic genera. More than half of these 153 species belong to the tribe Ceropegieae, with the highly succulent group, the stapeliads, represented by 58 species. It is shown that the family is most diverse in the extreme south of the country, in the Rosh Pinah and in the Karasburg districts. The distribution of each species is mapped and, for many genera, one species is illustrated with line drawings. Lectotypes are selected for several species.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 164.
ISBN: 978-1-919976-98-3
Price: SADC R230.00

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No. 33: Vegetation field atlas of continental South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland
Strelitzia33 L. Mucina, M.C. Rutherford, L.W. Powrie, A. van Niekerk & J.H. van der Merwe (eds) (2014)

This booklet is a product of the National Vegetation Mapping Project that gave South Africa a comprehensive classification and description of more than 400 vegetation types and a new, modern vegetation map. Chapter 18 of the manual to the vegetation map is republished here in an atlas format for use in the field. The Field Atlas features the vegetation of South Africa (excluding the sub-Antarctic islands), Lesotho and Swaziland on 46 sheets. As a new addition, an original detailed map of the vegetation of the Cape Peninsula has been added to mark the direction of further development of fine-scale vegetation mapping in South Africa. The Field Atlas is printed on water-proof paper to make it fit to withstand adverse weather conditions during field work.

Hard cover, A4 ring-bound, pp. 52.
ISBN: 978-1-919976-97-6
Price: SADC R230.00

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No. 32: Systematics and biology of the Cape genus Sparaxis (Iridaceae)
Strelitz32 P. Goldblatt & J.C. Manning (2013)

The South African genus Sparaxis Ker Gawl., a member of tribe Ixieae of subfamily Crocoideae of the Iridaceae, is endemic to the western half of the winter rainfall zone of southern Africa. The genus, described by John Ker Gawler in 1802 for species until then referred in Ixia L. or Gladiolus L., includes 16 species in this monographic account. One of them from lime-enriched habitats near Saldanha Bay, S. calcicola, is new to science. All species are corm-bearing, seasonal geophytes with horticultural potential, and one species, S. tricolor, is widely available in the horticultural trade. Molecular systematic study using nuclear and plastid DNA loci confirms morphological study that the genus Synnotia Sweet is nested in Sparaxis and provides the basis for an infrageneric classification subdividing the genus into two sections.

The molecular phylogeny is largely consistent with relationships inferred from morphology and shows that radial symmetry of the perianth probably evolved at least twice from ancestors with bilaterally symmetric (zygomorphic) flowers. These shifts in floral symmetry are pollinator-driven and are correlated with shifts from ancestral pollination by large-bodied anthophorine bees to either generalist pollination by multiple pollinator groups or to pollination dominated by hopliine beetles.

Based on relationships inferred from molecular phylogenetic studies, pollination dominated by hopliine beetles evolved three times in the genus and long-proboscid fly pollination twice. We review the floral biology of the genus and provide full taxonomic accounts for all species, accompanied by illustrations, distributional information, conservation status and taxonomic history.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 80.
ISBN: 9978-1-919976-89-1
Price: SADC R92.00

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No. 31: Guide to Plant Families of southern Africa
Strelitzia31 M. Koekemoer, H.M. Steyn & S.P. Bester (2014, edition 2)

Southern Africa has a total of 225 plant families with the 52 largest families covering over 90% of the flora. The large number of plant species in this region (ca. 24 000) makes identification to species level relatively difficult and the first step is usually to determine the family to which a specimen belongs. Knowledge of plant families allows one to place unknown plants into broad categories and then to focus on a smaller search for the correct name. This book aims to introduce readers to the beauty and diversity of our fascinating flora, and to enable scholars, students, amateurs and professionals alike to identify plants to family level. The identification process is introduced in a predominantly visual way by providing images to identify the key diagnostic characters for each family. The beauty of, and variation within each family is comprehensively illustrated with images of a range of genera. Additional information is provided on the distribution and usefulness of each family. It is hoped that this book will inspire readers to appreciate our indigenous flora.

Soft cover, 210 × 250 mm, pp. 300.
ISBN: 978-1-919976-92-1
Price: SADC R310.50

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No. 30: Plants of the Greater Cape Floristic Region volume 2: The Extra Cape Flora
Strelitzia30 Edited by D.A. Snijman (2013)

The Greater Cape Floristic Region of southern Africa, with an estimated 11 423 native vascular plant species, has one of the richest temperate floras in the world. The newly named Extra Cape Subregion comprises the northern, semi-arid part of the Region. Covering 98 900 km2 and incorporating 92% of the Succulent Karoo Biome, the Extra Cape Subregion has an estimated 3 715 native vascular plant species – ferns, other spore-bearing vascular plants and flowering plants – of which 40% are endemic.

Hard cover, 170 × 255 mm, pp. 552.
ISBN 978-1-919976-77-8
Price SADC R230.00

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No. 29: Plants of the Greater Cape Floristic Region volume 1: The Core Cape Flora
Strelitzia29 J.C. Manning & P. Goldblatt (2012)

The flora of the southwestern tip of Africa is one of the richest in the world. Recognized historically as the Cape Floristic Kingdom or Region, it encompasses a land area of 90 760 km2 with some 9 400 species of vascular plants (ferns and other spore-bearing vascular plants, gymnosperms, and flowering plants), of which just over 68% are endemic. Nearly half of all vascular plant species recorded in southern Africa, and around one fifth of the species recorded in sub-Saharan Africa, occur here. This treatment is a concise account of all known species, arranged according to the most recent systems of classification.

Hard cover, 170 × 255 mm, pp. 867.
ISBN 978-1-919976-74-7
ONLY AVAILABLE IN PDF FORMAT

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No. 28: The aloe names book
Strelitzia28 O.M. Grace, R.R. Klopper, E. Figueiredo & G.F. Smith (2011)

The aloe names book contains an annotated list of names for the genus Aloe, and is intended to provide a quick reference for checking names and key information about aloes. Accepted names are used in part one, where some of the more common species are also illustrated, as well as etymology, synonyms and all the known common names (given in various South African languages). Part two deals with names for which the exact application is unknown, part three with references, and part four lists the synonyms and common names. Published by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.

Hard cover, A5, pp. 239.
ISBN 978-1-919976-64-8
ONLY AVAILABLE IN PDF FORMAT

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No. 27: Botany and horticulture of the genus Freesia (Iridaceae)
Strelitzia27 J.C. Manning & P. Goldblatt (2011)

Freesias are well-known throughout the world as striking plants that add colour and fragrance to any garden or bouquet. Chapters include various aspects of botany such as the taxonomic history, phylogenetic relationships, systematics and a key to species. Additional useful information is provided on the ecology, biogeography, speciation patterns, horticultural history, and cultivation of freesias. A complete analysis of the floral scent chemistry of 13 taxa is also presented. This book is an essential addition to the library of any horticulturalist, taxonomist, biochemist, pollination biologist, biogeographer or interested plant enthusiast.

Soft cover, 180 × 240 mm, pp. 118.
ISBN 978-1-919976-58-7
Price SADC R80.50

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No. 26: Botanical exploration of southern Africa
Strelitzia26 H.F. Glen & G. Germishuizen (2010)

The first edition of ‘Botanical Explorations’ was written by M.D. Gunn and L.E.W. Codd, and was generally referred to as ‘Gunn & Codd’. It was an invaluable source of information on the numerous collectors who have contributed to the world’s knowledge of the plants of southern Africa. During the last 30 years many new botanists have added to the list of collectors, and a revised edition has thus been produced. The book surveys the history of plant collecting in southern Africa, from the earliest records to the present day. It contains information on each collector that has made a meaningful contribution to botany in this region, as well as numerous black and white illustrations and photographs.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 489.
ISBN 978-1-919976-54-9
ONLY AVAILABLE IN PDF FORMAT

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No. 25: Red Data List of South African Plants
Strelitzia25 D. Raimondo, L. Van Staden, W. Foden, J.E. Victor, N.A. Helme, R.C. Turner, D.A. Kamundi& P.A. Manyama (eds) (2009)

This Red List is a major milestone for South Africa in that it is the first data-driven, comprehensive assessment of the country’s indigenous vascular flora. South Africa is among 17 megadiverse countries that collectively hold 70% of the world’s plant species diversity. It is the first among these countries to do a comprehensive assessment of the status of its flora. This landmark publication indicates that 13% of South Africa’s plant species are threatened with extinction and that one in every four plants is of conservation concern. This is the first South African plant Red List to include detailed information on all plant species of conservation concern as well as a comprehensive analysis of threats to the South African flora. Guidelines for the application of this Red List are provided for conservation practitioners. Many species are depicted in colour photographs scattered throughout the text.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 668.
ISBN 978-1-919976-52-5
Price SADC R138.00

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No. 24: Historical plant incidence in southern Africa
Strelitzia24 Compiled by C.J. Skead (2009)

This collection of observations by early southern African travellers presents a picture of the vegetation as they saw it, painted by the pens of the earliest European visitors to the Cape and by those who, coming after, penetrated the subcontinent. The review covers South Africa, with additional notes on the neighbouring Namibia, Botswana, Lesotho and Zimbabwe; the extracts taken from many diverse works. The partial picture given here should go some way towards helping ecologists and botanists to visualise early conditions and, at the same time, save themselves the chore of searching through many volumes for what might be no more than a minor item. The book will be of significant use to plant taxonomists, geographers, ecologists, environmental historians and students of climate change. Seven early landscapes by various artists have been reproduced in colour to lend interest to the text.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 378.
ISBN 978-1-919976-53-2
Price SADC R92.00

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No. 23: Synopsis of the Lycopodiophyta and Pteridophyta of Africa, Madagascar
and neighbouring islands
Strelitzia23 J.P. Roux (2009)

This is a modern account of the lycopod and fern diversity of the region and an essential tool for any future taxonomic or biogeographical study of its flora. Family and generic, as well as species and subspecific names are arranged alphabetically. Accepted names are followed by the author citation and the original publication. Basionyms, homotypic and heterotypic synonyms are provided. The provenance and, where known, the type location are provided for the names and their synonyms. Where available, the locality data, date of collecting, collector and collector’s number are given. Many names have been lectotypified, with an indication of the lectotypifying author, year of publication and page number(s), where available. The chromosome number, with a reference, is provided in many cases. The listing of species distribution by country is based on literature surveys and on limited herbarium surveys. Mainly black-and-white, with eight pages of colour photos.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 255.
ISBN 978-1-919976-48-8
Price SADC R80.50

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No. 22: Plants of Angola/Plantas de Angola
Strelitzia22 E. Figueiredo & G.F. Smith (2008)

A comprehensive catalogue of the unusually rich, and poorly known botanical diversity of Angola, this book also provides extensive lists of scientific publications on the flora and on the floristic exploration of the country. The numerous botanical collectors who have operated there are listed and bibliographic references are given. The work presented in this book is the result of the effort of 32 researchers from nine countries who collaborated to produce a comprehensive list of the vascular plants of the country.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 279.
ISBN 978-1-919976-45-7
Price SADC R161.00

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No. 21: Molteno ferns: Late Triassic biodiversity in southern Africa
Strelitzia21 H.M. Anderson & J.M. Anderson (2008)

This monograph on the Molteno ferns is the fourth in a series describing the Late Triassic Molteno fossil flora. It gives a comprehensive description of the Filicophyta (ferns) from the Late Triassic Molteno Formation, Karoo Basin, South Africa. It is based on an overall collection over 27 000 catalogued slabs from 100 assemblages, with ferns being recovered from half of the assemblages. The fern fossils described include 18 species in seven genera based on fertile material and a further 18 species in eight genera known only from sterile fronds. The descriptions of the genera and species are supported by high-quality black-and-white photographs arranged in 100 plates and also by annotated line drawings. The volume benefits from the addition of 52 colour photographs, breaking into new territory in the series of Molteno volumes.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 260.
ISBN: 978-1-919976-36-5
Price SADC R92.00

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No. 20: Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology
Strelitzia20 J.M. Anderson, H.M. Anderson & C.J. Cleal (2007)

A global synthesis of gymnosperm families, fossil and extant; providing a new and distinctive perspective on the macroevolutionary biodiversity trends within this group through their 375 million year history. The stratigraphic ranges of the 84 gymnosperm families are plotted according to their first and last appearances in the fossil record. A series of 30 full-page colour charts provide the holistic context in which to interpret gymnosperm history. Also included is a systematic coverage of floral kingdoms, biodiversity patterns, insect associations and other fields, traced period by period from the Devonian to Quaternary. The final chapter covers gymnosperm biodiversity trends at the microevolutionary (genera and species) level, taken from a selection of some 13 important localities scattered globally and through the geological column. Richly illustrated with line drawings, tables and charts.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 290.
ISBN 978-1-919976-39-6
Price SADC R92.00

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No. 19: The vegetation of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland
Strelitzia19 L. Mucina & M.C. Rutherford (eds) (2006)

An up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the vegetation of South Africa and the two small neighbouring countries of Lesotho and Swaziland. This account is based on a vegetation survey using appropriate tools of contemporary vegetation mapping and vegetation description. The aim was to draw a new vegetation map that depicts the complexity and macro-scale ecology and reflects the level of (and identifies and reveals gaps in) current knowledge of the vegetation of the region. This is an extensive account of the vegetation of a complex and biologically intriguing part of the world, offering not only insights into structure and dynamics of the vegetation cover, but containing a wealth of base-line data for further vegetation-ecological, biogeographical, and conservation-oriented studies. Included towards the back of the book is an atlas as a systematic series of A4 maps depicting the various vegetation types. The electronic version on the CD inside the front cover allows the user to zoom in at any scale to discern detail. The Map and the descriptive account of the vegetation of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland target not only scientific academia and the secondary and tertiary education sectors, but offers a powerful decision-making tool for conservationists, land and resource planners, and politicians as well as the interested public at large. The accompanying wall map is listed under ‘Posters’ and the electronic copy of the publication under ‘cD’s.

Hard copy. A4. pp 808.
ISBN-13: 978-1-919976-21-1 (ISBN-10: 1-919976-21-3)
Price SADC R575.00

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No. 18: A revision of the southern African genus Babiana, Iridaceae: Crocoideae
Strelitzia18 P. Goldblatt & J.C. Manning (2007)

Babiana, as now constituted, is largely a genus of the winter rainfall zone of western South Africa and southwestern Namibia. Just two species occur in the southern African summer rainfall zone, B. hypogaea and B. bainesii, the latter widespread and extending from the Upper Karoo through Botswana and Namibia to Zimbabwe and southern Zambia. The authors recognise 88 species, a substantial increase over the 61 included in Babiana by G.J. Lewis in her 1959 monograph. This revision also presents a new infrageneric classification of Babiana, which is divided into three sections. Each species is described and 15 species are accompanied by line drawings, with 48 maps and 45 colour photographs. Excluded names, a list of references and an index to species and synonyms are provided at the back of the book.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 110.
ISBN 978-1-919976-32-7
Price SADC R80.50

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Suricata

This series publishes original, peer-reviewed scientific research on various aspects of zoological diversity.
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No. 10: Conservation status of the reptiles of
South Africa, Eswatini and Lesotho
Suricata10 K.A. Tolley, W. Conradie, D.W. Pietersen, J. Weeber, M. Burger & G.J. Alexander (eds.) (2023)

This publication details the IUCN Red List assessments for all 401 described reptile species (Crocodilia, Testudines and Squamata) that occur in South Africa, Eswatini and Lesotho, excluding marine and introduced species.

Each species account provides an extinction risk assessment, a description of the range and the active threats, as well as recommendations for conservation. In addition, new photographs of each species have been included.

This volume can be used as a reference handbook, but also as a field guide for both professionals and laypersons when reviewing the distributions of reptiles.

Hard cover, 210 × 297 mm, pp. 660.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-63-1
Price SADC R1347.00

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No. 9: A taxonomic monograph of the sea cucumbers of southern Africa (Echinodermata: Holothuroidea)
Suricata09 A.S. Thandar (2022)

The southern African marine region, which lies in the transitional zone between the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific biomes, has a very rich biodiversity with elements from the two major oceanic regions. This taxonomic monograph, long awaited by local enthusiasts, marine biologists and holothuroid specialists worldwide, focuses on the southern African Holothuroidea. It is based on the author’s approximately 55 years of research on the taxonomy of sea cucumbers with specific emphasis on the southern African fauna.

The monograph includes a brief account of the materials used; fixation, preservation and other techniques; an illustrated account of gross morphological features of mostly the shallow-water holothuroids; an illustrated glossary of the microscopic ossicles; some zoogeographical considerations; an updated checklist that summarises the composition, biodiversity and faunistic components of all southern African holothuroids; a dichotomous key to orders, families, genera and species; and the systematic account of all recorded species. All seven currently recognised orders are represented, distributed over 26 families, 76 genera and 171 nominal and 10 indeterminate species. These include a couple of new records for the southern African region. South Africa has 152 nominal species.

Each species account has a selected synonymy indicating the most pertinent synonyms, a brief diagnosis, the type locality, habitat notes, distribution data, concise remarks, a figure of the most important diagnostic characters and a distribution map. A comprehensive index and a full list of references that are cited or used in the text are also provided.

Hard cover, 210 × 297 mm, pp. 364.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-50-1
Price SADC R793.50

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No. 8: Manual of Afrotropical Diptera. Volume 3. Brachycera–Cyclorrhapha, excluding Calyptratae
Suricata08 A.H. Kirk-Spriggs & B.J. Sinclair (eds) (2021)

Volume 3 includes family chapters dealing with 51 of the 108 families of flies that occur in the region and covers the Brachycera: Cyclorrhapha, excluding Calyptratae (sometimes termed the higher Diptera). Each chapter includes a diagnosis of the family, sections dealing with biology and immature stages, classification and identification, an identification key to genera (if more than one) and a synopsis of the fauna section, arranged genus by genus alphabetically. The text is richly illustrated with over 3,447 illustrations, including 1,746 colour and 101 black and white images and 1,600 line drawings of flies.

Hard cover, 215 × 275 mm, pp. 1 032.
ISBN 978-1-928224-13-6
Price SADC R1 725.00

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No. 7: Cicadas of southern Africa. An illustrated guide to known species
Suricata07 R.D. Stephen (2021)

This guide describes the diversity of cicadas, that are well known for their shrill song on hot summer days, but which are so skilfully concealed, that they are often only seen when disturbed, or after a careful and surreptitious search. The guide sets out to lift the covers off this interesting, shy and defenceless creature, and answer some of the questions and misconceptions about it. Above all, it is intended to be an identification aid to all those admirable specialists and dedicated amateur workers and volunteers in museums, those active in conservation, ecological impact studies, databasing and other vital biodiversity and environmental studies. It is hoped that this guide will encourage further interest and research into these largely unknown insects and their life histories, distribution, ecology and their niche in the southern African environment.

Hard cover, 170 × 240 mm, pp. 216.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-42-6
Price SADC R448.50

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No. 6: Conservation Assessment of Scarabaeine dung beetles in South Africa, Botswana and Namibia: IUCN Red List Categories, Atlas and Ecological Notes
Suricata06 A.L.V. Davis, C.M. Deschodt & C.H. Scholtz (2020)

Accounts and photographs are provided for over 500 scarabaeine dung beetle species recorded in South Africa, Botswana and Namibia. This amounts to an estimated 80% of the regional fauna with the missing species primarily belonging to a single tribe (Onthophagini) for which validation of names and description of new species is an ongoing task. The accounts for tribes, genera and validated species provide information on taxonomic and conservation status, geographical range and distribution, temporal and climatic range, as well as notes on associations with soil, vegetation and food type (where available). Following the species accounts, is a short synthesis of current dung beetle systematics and its shortcomings, analyses of group distribution patterns across southern Africa, and threats to conservation of the dung beetle fauna. In addition, several large tables provide quick reference to range size, distribution pattern and conservation status, as well as climatic and ecological associations of each species (where known).

Hard cover, 210 × 297 mm, pp. 808.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-39-6
Price SADC R1 092.50

Please contact the Bookshop (sanbibookshop@sanbi.org.za) to request a free copy of the PDF.

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No. 5: Manual of Afrotropical Diptera. Volume 2. Nematocerous Diptera and lower Brachycera
Suricata05 A.H. Kirk-Spriggs & B.J. Sinclair (eds) (2017)

Volume 2 includes family chapters dealing with 43 of the 108 families of flies that occur in the region and covers the nematocerous Diptera and lower Brachycera (sometimes termed the lower Diptera). Each chapter includes a diagnosis of the family, sections dealing with biology and immature stages, classification and identification, an identification key to genera (if more than one) and a synopsis of the fauna section, arranged genus by genus alphabetically. The text is richly illustrated with over 2 900 illustrations, including 1 360 colour and 130 black and white images and 1 430 line drawings of flies.

Hard cover, 215 × 275 mm, pp. 440.
ISBN 978-1-928224-12-9
Price SADC R598.00

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No. 4: Manual of Afrotropical Diptera. Volume 1. Introductory chapters and keys to Diptera families
Suricata04 A.H. Kirk-Spriggs & B.J. Sinclair (eds) (2017)

True flies, or Diptera, constitute one of the largest orders of insects in the biosphere, with over 160 000 described species worldwide, more than 20 000 of which occur in the Afrotropical Region. They are as diverse morphologically and biologically as they are numerous and many groups have evolved spectacular structural adaptations that are commensurate with their environment and biology. During their long evolutionary history, virtually every terrestrial niche has been occupied by the Diptera, making them one of the most successful groups of organisms on Earth. Many have co-evolved in association with other organisms and become highly specialised parasites or parasitoids of a range of disparate groups of plants and animals. Whether focusing on their systematics, biology, biogeography, conservation, or the more applied aspects, the Diptera remain a fascinating and intriguing group. This four volume book, a collaboration of over 90 international experts on Diptera, is the first-ever synopsis of the 108 families of flies known from the Afrotropical Region and includes discussions on biology and immature stages, economic importance, classification, identification to the genus level, as well as a synopsis of each genus. This work provides the basics for understanding the diversity of a major order of insects in a large tropical and sub-tropical region and is the first such synopsis of its kind for any major insect order occurring in the Afrotropics.

Volume 1 includes 11 general introductory chapters dealing with the history of Afrotropical dipterology, collection and preservation, morphology and terminology, natural history, agricultural and veterinary, medical, forensic and phytosanitary significance, biogeography, conservation and the phylogeny of flies. The volume also includes identification keys to all Afrotropical fly families for both adult and larval stages. The text is richly illustrated with over 1 600 illustrations, including 40 colour maps, 800 colour and 60 black and white images and 690 line drawings of flies.

Hard cover, 215 × 275 mm, pp. 948.
ISBN 978-1-928224-11-2
Price SADC R402.50

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No. 3: A Bilingual Field Guide to the Frogs of Zululand
Suricata03 F.M. Phaka, E.C. Netherlands, D.J.D. Kruger & L.H. du Preez (2017)

Frogs are in general poorly known and highly misunderstood; yet they are among the most important members of the animal kingdom. These harmless creatures are as colourful and melodious as birds and they have outlived dinosaurs, but are currently under threat of extinction. Their presence or absence can tell us a lot about an environment and their presence is vital to the functioning of many ecosystems. Frogs are an unusual group of animals as they live in two different environments; water and land. Being unusual is what makes them important and it unfortunately also contributes to them being misunderstood.

Soft cover, A5. English: 87 pp. Zulu: 89 pp.
ISBN 978-1-928224-19-8
Price SADC R115.00

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No. 2: Manual of Freshwater Assessment for South Africa: Dragonfly Biotic Index
Suricata02 M.J. Samways & J.P. Simaika (2016)

Overall, freshwater ecosystems are the most threatened ecosystem type in the world. The scarce South African freshwaters are threatened by alien organisms, high volumes of water abstraction, and pollution. Yet some South African freshwaters are being restored to their former condition. It is important to monitor these systems and note whether they are declining or improving. One way to do this is to use the Dragonfly Biotic Index, which is based on dragonfly biogeography, their sensitivity to change, and the degree to which they are threatened. This index is sensitive and robust and is suitable for assessing and monitoring freshwaters across the country. This manual explains how to use and apply the Dragonfly Biotic Index, while also providing guidelines for species identification.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 224.
ISBN 978-1-928224-05-1
Price SADC R230.00

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No. 1: Atlas and Red List of the Reptiles of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland
Suricata01 M.F. Bates, W.R. Branch, A.M. Bauer, M. Burger, J. Marais, G.J. Alexander and M.S. de Villiers (2014)

This Atlas and Red List details the outcomes of the Southern African Reptile Conservation Assessment (SARCA), the most thorough reptile assessment project ever conducted in Africa. The conservation status of the 422 recognised species and subspecies of reptiles of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland was evaluated against IUCN guidelines, based on detailed distribution maps, published literature and the collective expertise of leading herpetologists. Maps were based on records from museums, conservation agencies, published literature, targeted fieldwork, and an online virtual museum.

The assessment revealed that one-fifth of all species and subspecies are of conservation concern, mainly because of habitat alteration. Two species are now extinct, whereas 36 are classified as threatened (five Critically Endangered, 10 Endangered and 21 Vulnerable). As much as 45% of the region’s indigenous taxa are endemic, including most taxa of conservation concern.

This important publication includes, for the first time, colour photographs of all snakes, lizards, tortoises, terrapins, turtles and crocodiles of the region, as well as detailed maps illustrating their ranges. Accounts for each taxon also include details on taxonomic and conservation status, habitat, and threats. Introductory chapters discuss project design, data management, taxonomy, evolutionary relationships, conservation status, endemism, threats, and diversity hotspots.
The Atlas will appeal not only to herpetologists, but also to other biologists, naturalists, conservation planners and managers, environmental consultants, legislators, and members of the public.

Hard cover, A4, pp. 504.
ISBN 978-1-919976-84-6
Price SADC R546.25

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Ad hoc publications

Publications with botanical or zoological subject matter not accommodated in the Strelitzia or Suricata series.
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Guide to the identification of succulent plant species included by South Africa in Appendix III of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES)
Succulent ID guide T. Variawa, M.F. Pfab & L. Jabar (2023)

Succulent plant species are highly prized amongst both amateur and specialist collectors of unique and exotic ornamental plants. Over the past five years or so, the international demand for rare and unique succulent plants has increased, which some have termed the ‘global succulent boom’, and this has impacted several succulent-rich countries. South Africa has been particularly hard hit by an increase in the illegal and unsustainable collection of its unique succulent flora, to such an extent that the populations of several endemic species have been reduced to a point of non-viability or even extinction. One highly targeted genus (Conophytum) and seventeen other species from southern African were included in Appendix III of CITES, to urgently bring this growing international trade of succulent plants under control. Appreciating the difficulty associated with identifying species in trade, this well-illustrated guide provides information to assist law enforcement and border officials with the identification of live specimens of the listed species, as well as characteristics that may be used to distinguish between wild-collected and artificially propagated specimens.

Soft cover, 210 × 297 mm, pp. 100.
ISBN: 978-1-928224-62-4
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South African animals at risk of extinction
M.T. Sethusa, D.L. Dalton & C. Pretorius (2022)

Explore a selection of 14 South African animal taxa. Get to know about their lives, their history and the threats they face.

This fantastic book covers pressures that some of the threatened South African animal species face. Using available literature, scientists provide insight into worldwide research and translate it into easy-to-read text that will capture your mind and imagination.

With spectacular photography and detailed text on a variety of animals, from grasshoppers to elephants, this book highlights some of South Africa’s biodiversity and elaborates on what you can do in your daily life to make a conservation-conscious difference in this remarkable world.

Hard cover, 250 × 250 mm, pp. 136.
ISBN 978-1-928224-59-4
Price SADC R813.05

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Ecosystem Guidelines for the Savanna Biome
SANBI (2021)

The Savanna Biome is the largest biome in South Africa, occupying more than one third of the country’s surface area (Twine et al. 2003). The biome covers an area of ~399 600 km2, occurring in all provinces other than the Western Cape, and predominates in the northern and eastern sections of the country. This Ecosystem Guidelines divide the Savanna Biome into eight Ecosystem Groups, seven terrestrial groups and one inland aquatic, which share similar ecological drivers, characteristics and have similar management requirements. This document is supported by a spatial dataset with boundaries of each of the Groups. The reader should check the location of their area of interest to determine if the guideline has applicability, and if so, which Ecosystem Group applies.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 168.
ISBN 978-1-928224-49-5
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Ecosystem Guidelines for the Albany Thicket Biome
SANBI (2021)

Ecosystem guidelines have been developed for a number of biomes in South Africa. They represent the collective knowledge from a range of stakeholders and researchers, and incorporate the best available science. The guidelines aim to communicate complex and technical information in a non-technical format in order to make the information accessible to non-scientists. The guidelines also provide contextual information about the ecosystem types in the biome and supply step-by-step guidelines in terms of what ecosystem features and characteristics, key drivers of the ecosystems which are important to consider, and provide recommendations about how the ecosystems should be assessed or managed.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 180.
ISBN 978-1-928224-45-7
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The South African National Ecosystem Classification System Handbook: First Edition
SANBI (2021)

The South African National Ecosystem Classification System (SA-NECS) uses common principles and approaches to classify, describe and map ecosystem types across all of South Africa’s territory. For each realm (terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine and marine), this handbook presents the ecosystem classification system and maps (including their historical development), and outlines governance structures and processes that support their maintenance and updates. The handbook describes a range of applications of the SA-NECS, such as assessments for the Red List of Ecosystems, spatial biodiversity prioritisation, marine spatial planning, climate change modelling, management of ecological infrastructure, ecosystem accounting, and research and education.

This resource brings together several decades of collaborative work by South African scientists, in partnership with government, the private sector and citizen scientists, and makes it accessible to practitioners across diverse fields.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 64.
ISBN
978-1-928224-52-5
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South Africa’s New Marine Protected Areas
K. Sink, R. Adams, J. Mann, O. Whitehead, M. Franken & K. Maze (2019)

In 2019 the South African Minister of Environmental Affairs approved the declaration of 20 new Marine Protected Areas (MPAs). This proclamation was the culmination of over 12 years of research by scientists from DEA, SANBI and a network of research institutions. The research identified areas of ecological and biodiversity importance in the South African EEZ. Through careful Marine Spatial Planning, ocean industries such as fishing, mining and shipping can co-exist with marine protected areas, and in the case of fisheries, even benefit. The government’s initiative of Operation Phakisa, meaning ‘hurry up’, fast-tracked the implementation of the planning of these MPAs. In this book each of the new MPAs will be introduced, highlighting their special features and why they are important.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 56.
ISBN 978-1-928224-31-0
Price SADC R69.00

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National Biodiversity Assessment 2018: The status of South Africa’s ecosystems and biodiversity. Synthesis Report
Prepared by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (2019)

This synthesis report presents the summarised results of South Africa’s NBA 2018, and is underpinned by seven technical reports. The NBA is led by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), and is a collaborative effort from over 470 individuals from approximately 90 institutions. The NBA synthesises the best available science on South Africa’s biodiversity to inform policy and decision making in a range of sectors, and contribute to national development priorities. NBA 2018 follows on from the previous two assessments in 2004 and 2011, and is an important part of SANBI’s mandate to monitor and report regularly on the status of the country’s biodiversity, in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (Act 10 of 2004). NBA 2018 showcases findings for the headline indicators of threat status and protection level for both ecosystems and species, and presents these findings across the terrestrial, inland aquatic, estuarine and marine realms, as well as for the coast and South Africa’s sub-Antarctic territory (Prince Edward and Marion Islands and associated waters). New analyses in NBA 2018 include an examination of potential ways to assess genetic diversity on a national scale, trend analyses for species threat status, and an assessment of land cover change in the terrestrial environment. The NBA highlights the crucial role of biodiversity assets and ecological infrastructure in providing benefits to people that underpin social and economic development.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 224.
ISBN 978-1-928224-34-1
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Biodiversity highlights from South Africa. Contributions to the global Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020
Prepared by the South African National Biodiversity Institute (2019)

As the decade of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011–2020 draws to a close, we reflect on our progress towards its vision of ‘a world living in harmony with nature’. It is necessary to be self-critical, and acknowledge the continuing challenges towards achieving the Aichi Biodiversity Targets. However, it is also important to remind ourselves of our achievements over the past decade. Through the commitment and dedication of government, non-governmental organisations, researchers, financial donors, the private sector, civil society and ordinary people, we have made some significant strides towards achieving the objectives of the Convention on Biological Diversity.

In this booklet, we focus on the good news for biodiversity from South Africa. This is by no means a complete report card of South Africa’s work towards each Aichi Biodiversity Target, nor an assessment of the remaining work to be done. Rather, each short snippet shares a real win for biodiversity that has proven to be a valued step forward. These successes are a source of optimism and hope that will prompt us toward facing the post-2020 future with renewed enthusiasm.

Soft cover, 210 × 260 mm, pp. 60.
ISBN 978-1-928224-38-9
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The sand forest of Maputaland
Francois du Randt (2018)

Maputaland in the northeast corner of KwaZulu-Natal lies at the southern end of one of the largest coastal plains in Africa. It is a beautiful area and incredibly species rich, with high levels of plant and animal endemism. The sand forest of Maputaland is especially unique in its biological diversity, geological history and vegetation dynamics. This book provides a comprehensive natural historical overview of Maputaland, covering subjects such as: early explorers and inhabitants, topography and hydrology, climate, geology, soils, effect of fires, the biotic environment and vegetation. The sand forest of Maputaland is discussed in detail, with information about the differences between the various forest types, the soils of the sand forest, allelopathy, the origin of sand forest, the surrounding vegetation, as well as the fauna and flora of the sand forest. Information about the fauna and flora of the Maputaland Sand Forest is given in a narrative format, where interesting plants and animals are discussed in chapters titled, amongst others, ‘The magical ordeal tree’, ‘Torches in the forest’, ‘Sherbets and bushbabies’, ‘The deadman’s tree’, ‘Climbers and owls’ and ‘The winged-fruited ones’. Information is also provided about marine sediments and fossils, as well as about accommodation, reserves and leopards of the region. Information for plants and animals discussed includes a short description, the scientific and vernacular names (and origin or meanings of these names), as well as interesting uses and interactions.

Hard cover, 250 × 250 mm, pp. 428.
ISBN 978-1-928224-26-6
Price SADC R902.75

Please contact the Bookshop (sanbibookshop@sanbi.org.za) to request a free copy of the PDF.

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Invasive alien plant species of Gaborone
M.K. Marumo (2018)

Invasive alien plants are a real problem in Botswana. They impose negative impacts such as the choking of rivers, lowering crop yields, spoiling the natural beauty of landscapes and they use a lot of underground water, thus reducing the available amount of water for other plants and humans. A lot of funds are needed to control and eradicate them, so early detection and control of these species are imperative. These plants are usually introduced intentionally as ornamentals and crops, or unintentionally through dispersal of seeds by wind, water, humans and animals. This book is an outcome of observation or monitoring of invasive alien plants in Gaborone, the capital city of Botswana. Several invasive alien plants have been observed in Gaborone. They have been recorded from riverbeds, beside roads, in disturbed areas, in open spaces, around residential areas, around business areas and other places in the city. The purpose of this booklet is to help members of the community, law enforcers and researchers interested in management of invasive alien plants with these species’ identification. This book documents 16 invasive alien plants observed in Gaborone from 2013 to 2017. Continuous monitoring is necessary to gather more data on these and other invasive alien species.

Soft cover, 180 × 260 mm, pp. 28.
ISBN 978-1-928224-24-2
Price SADC R57.50

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Obituary: Bernard de Winter (31 July 1924–8 May 2017)
O.A. Leistner (2018)

‘A man upright and tenacious of purpose’

A life, almost Old Testament long, rich and multifaceted, touching several generations of students and lovers of plants, and of men, women and children in need of help; a man as seen through the eyes of his colleagues, acquaintances, family members and friends. Thus begin this booklet about the life and works of Dr Bernard de Winter and his wife Mayda. Compiled by Dr O.A. Leistner, lifelong colleague and friend of Dr de Winter, full of anecdotes and interesting facts. Well worth a read.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 36.
ISBN 978-1-928224-30-3
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The Business Case for Biodiversity Stewardship
Author: SANBI (2017)

This report presents the case for increased investment in biodiversity stewardship programmes in South Africa as a cost effective mechanism for expanding the protected area network to meet national and international protected area targets. Based on a detailed analysis of the Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal experiences, the Business Case shows that establishing a protected area through a biodiversity stewardship contract with a landowner costs the state between 70 and 400 times less per hectare than establishing a state-owned protected area through land acquisition. When it comes to ongoing management, the cost to the state of supporting the management of a contract protected area by the landowner is between 4 and 17 times lower per hectare than the cost to the state of managing a state-owned protected area. A small additional financial investment by the state in biodiversity stewardship programmes would enable large numbers of private and communal landowners to contribute to the country’s conservation and development objectives, while boosting rural livelihoods and creating a healthier natural environment.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 48.
ISBN 978-1-928224-22-8
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Technical Guidelines for CBA maps: Guidelines for developing a map of Critical Biodiversity Areas & Ecological Support Areas using systematic biodiversity planning
Author: SANBI (2017)

This document provides guidelines for biodiversity planning practitioners in South Africa on how to develop and present a map of Critical Biodiversity Areas (CBAs) and Ecological Support Areas (ESAs), or ‘CBA Map’, based on a systematic biodiversity plan. These guidelines set out the rationale for CBA Maps, and provide minimum technical requirements as well as recommended good practice for developing these maps, based on the collective experience of the biodiversity planning community in South Africa over more than a decade.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 50.
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Grasses of the Botswana National Botanical Garden
A.M. Isaiah & T. Komi (2015)

Thirty-three grass species found to occur in the Botswana National Botanical Garden during a three-month long survey in the summer of 2012 are presented in this guide. Each species is illustrated by a photograph of a herbarium specimen, supplemented by some short notes on its morphology, its habitat and the frequency with which the species occur in the garden. The species are arranged alphabetically according to scientific names and English and Tswana common names are also provided. All specimens illustrated in this guide are available in the National Herbarium of Botswana (GAB) in Gaborone.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 36.
ISBN 978-1-928224-10-5
Price SADC R57.50

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South Africa’s Strategy for Plant Conservation
D. Raimondo (editor) (2015)

South Africa is signatory to the Convention on Biological Diversity and is committed to the implementation of a national strategy to conserve plants that aligns with the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC). With 6% of the world’s plant diversity and strong botanical and conservation capacity, South Africa is well placed to make a significant contribution to plant conservation globally. This document presents South Africa’s National Strategy for Plant Conservation. It includes 16 outcome oriented targets, each of which, if implemented well, will help lead to improved conservation of South Africa’s plants. The targets include work that ranges from the description, assessment and conservation (in situ and ex situ) of South Africa’s plants; to work on the sustainable utilisation of plant species. In South Africa, plant conservation is not done in isolation of other biodiversity conservation work. This National Strategy for Plant Conservation aligns with South Africa’s updated National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP). Each of the outcomes in this plant strategy is either directly represented or nested under one of the activities of the NBSAP. Under the leadership of the South African National Biodiversity Institute (the focal point for the implementation of the GSPC nationally), and with support from the Botanical Society of South Africa, a network of botanists and conservationists has been developed that includes conservation agencies, NGOs and academic institutions. It is this strong network that will ensure that South Africa’s National Strategy for Plant Conservation is implemented by 2020.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 84.
ISBN 978-1-928224-04-4
Price SADC R138.00

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Plants in Peril
D. Raimondo, K. Grieve, N. Helme, R. Koopman & I. Ebrahim (2013)

South Africa has the highest documented number of extinct plant species of any country in the world. As a result of human destruction of natural areas for agriculture and urban development, as well as the spread of invasive alien plants and illegal harvesting of plants for horticultural and medicinal trade, 2 553 plant species are currently threatened with extinction. This publication focuses on 100 of these plants, some of which are on the brink of extinction, with the aims of highlighting the factors threatening their survival and raising awareness of the actions required for their conservation.

Hard cover, 257 × 254 mm, pp. 215.
ISBN: 978-1-919976-87-7
Price SADC R454.25

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Distribution of plant diversity in the Core Cape Floristic Subregion
M. Freiberg & J. Manning (2013)

The Core Cape Floristic Region comprises an estimated 9 383 species of vascular plants in 997 genera and 178 families. Available literature provides some guidance on roughly where to go to best explore this remarkably diverse and charismatic flora, but until now it has been nearly impossible to get a more exact idea of where to find the richest concentrations of species. This collection of floristic maps visualises the distribution of the Cape Flora at the taxonomic levels of family and genus, making it simpler for conservationists, botanists and tourists to identify centres of diversity and species richness within the region.

Soft cover, 297 × 148 mm. 195 pp.
ISBN: 978-1-919976-85-3
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Medicinal and Charm Plants of Pondoland
S. Zukulu, T. Dold, T. Abbott & D. Raimondo (2012)

Pondoland is a region of exceptional natural beauty and a wealth of endemic plant species, some of which have significant importance to local inhabitants. After introducing the participants who provided information on the 60 plants described in the book, the region’s natural history is outlined briefly. Sixty amayeza (traditional Mpondo medicines and charms) plants and their uses are described in this book. Information for each species includes the common and scientific names, followed by a short description, and its medicinal and cultural uses. Colour photographs illustrate the plants and their uses. The information presented in this book, is primarily aimed at school pupils, but it will also be of interest to everyone interested in plants in the region. The primary focus is not only to support scholars in their curriculum requirements, but also aims to reawaken indigenous cultural knowledge and encourage the youth of Pondoland to engage with their unique biodiversity to ensure a sustainable future. The book further provides a useful glossary, references for further reading, and an index of the 60 plants listed and described.

Soft cover, A5, pp. 79.
ISBN 978-1-919976-71-6
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National Biodiversity Assessment 2011: an assessment of South Africa’s biodiversity and ecosystems
A. Driver, K.J. Sink, J.L. Nel, S. Holness, L. van Niekerk, F. Daniels, Z. Jonas, P.A. Majiedt, L. Harris& K. Maze (2012)

This report presents the results of South Africa’s National Biodiversity Assessment 2011. The NBA 2011 follows on the National Spatial Biodiversity Assessment 2004, broadening the scope of the assessment to include key thematic issues as well as a spatial assessment. It fulfils a core aspect of SANBI’s mandate: to monitor and report on the state of South Africa’s biodiversity. The assessment covers the terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine and marine environments, as well as species of special concern and invasive alien species. The NBA provides headline indicators of the state of South Africa’s ecosystems, and highlights the crucial role of ecological infrastructure in providing ecosystems services that underpin social and economic development. It presents new work on geographic areas that contribute to climate change resilience, and reflect the enormous progress made since 2004 in mapping and assessing biodiversity in aquatic environments. In includes a summary of spatial biodiversity priority areas that have been identified through systematic biodiversity plans at nation, provincial and local level. The NBA is led by the South African National Biodiversity Institute in partnership with a range of organisations. It represents a collaborative effort to translate best available science into policy-relevant indicators and information that can inform action and support wise decision-making in the biodiversity sector and beyond.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 198.
ISBN 978-1-919976-72-3
Price SADC R138.00

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National Protected Area Expansion Strategy for South Africa 2008. Priorities for expanding the protected area network for ecological sustainability and climate change adaptation
Prepared by the Government of South Africa (2010)

South Africa’s protected area network falls short of sustaining biodiversity and ecological processes. In this context, the goal of the National Protected Area Expansion Strategy is to achieve cost-effective protected area expansion for ecological sustainability and increased resilience to climate change. This document highlights ways in which we can become more efficient and effective in allocating the scarce human and financial resources available for protected area expansion. It sets targets for protected area expansion, provides maps of the most important areas for protected area expansion, and makes recommendations on mechanisms for protected area expansion.

Soft cover, A4, pp. 47.
ISBN 978-1-919976-55-6
Price SADC R46.00

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Trees of the year posters

Full colour posters providing descriptions and photographs, as well as notes on horticulture, ecology and uses of the annual trees of the year.
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Trees of the year poster 2023
TOTY2023 The 2023 trees of the year are Buddleja saligna (false olive), Bolusanthus speciosus (tree wisteria) and Leucadendron argenteum (silver tree). This colourful, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of the trees, including common names and meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and interesting facts are discussed for all three trees of the year.

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Trees of the year poster 2022
TOTY2022 The 2022 trees of the year are Dais cotinifolia (pompontree), Peltophorum africanum (African-wattle), Aloidendron dichotomum (quivertree) and Aloidendron pillansii (giant quivertree). This colourful, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of the trees, including common names and meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and interesting facts are discussed for all four trees of the year.

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Trees of the year poster 2021
TOTY2021 The 2021 trees of the year are Portulacaria afra (porkbush), Vachellia karroo (sweet thorn) and Warburgia salutaris (pepperbark-tree). This colourful, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of the trees, including common names and meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and interesting facts are discussed for all three our trees of the year.

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Trees of the year poster 2020
TOTY2020 The 2020 trees of the year are Adansonia digitata (baobab) and Ekebergia capensis (Cape-ash). This full colour, double-sided poster provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including their common names and the meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and other uses are discussed for each tree.

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Trees of the year poster 2019
TOTY2019 The 2019 trees of the year are Sclerocarya birrea (marula) and Philenoptera violacea (apple-leaf). This full colour, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including their common names and the meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and other uses are discussed for each tree.

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Trees of the year poster 2018
TOTY2018 The 2018 trees of the year are Podocarpus elongatus (Breede River yellowwood), P. henkelii (Henkel’s yellow­wood), P. latifolius (real yellowwood and South Africa’s national tree), Afrocarpus falcatus (synonym = Podocarpus falcatus; Outeniqua yellowwood) and Boscia albitrunca (shepherd’s tree). This full colour, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including their common names and the meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and other uses are discussed for each tree.

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Trees of the year poster 2017
TOTY2017 The 2017 trees of the year are Ziziphus mucronata (buffalo-thorn) and Euclea pseudebenus (ebony guarri). This full colour, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including common names and meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and other uses are discussed for each tree.

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Trees of the year poster 2016
TOTY2016 The 2016 trees of the year are Ficus burkei (common wild fig or strangler fig), F. petersii (Peter’s fig), Maerua angolensis subsp. angolensis (beadbean) and M. cafra (bushcherry or spiderbush). This full colour, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including common names and meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and other uses are discussed for each tree.

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Trees of the year poster 2015
TOTY2015 The 2015 trees of the year are Combretum kraussii and Heteromorpha arborescens (four varieties: var. arborescens, var. abyssinica, var. collina and var. frutescens). This full colour, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including common names and meanings of their scientific names. Detailed information on the general appearance, distribution and habitat, horticultural notes, ecology and other uses are discussed for each tree.

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Trees of the year poster 2014
TOTY2014 The 2014 trees of the year are Vepris lanceolata and the genus Heteropyxis (represented by H. canescens, H. dehniae and H. natalensis). This full colour, A2, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs of these trees including common names and meanings of their scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2013
TOTY2013 The trees of the year for 2013 are Virgilia oroboides (Fabaceae), Grewia occidentalis (Malvaceae) and Barringtonia racemosa (Lecythidaceae). This full colour, A2, double-sided poster, which folds up into an A5 brochure, provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2012
TOTY2012 The trees of the year for 2012 are Syzygium cordatum, Protorhus longifolia and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. This full colour, A1 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2011
TOTY2011 The trees of the year for 2011 are Pappea capensis, Nuxia congesta and Pavetta lanceolata. This full colour, A1 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2010
TOTY2010 The trees of the year for 2010 are Acacia xanthophloea, Cladostemon kirkii and Rothmannia capensis. This full colour, A1 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2009
TOTY2009 The trees of the year for 2009 are Acacia galpinii, Pterocarpus rotundifolius and Halleria lucida. This full colour, A1 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2008
TOTY2008 The trees of the year for 2008 are Diospyros whyteana, Harpephyllum caffrum and Markhamia zanzibarica. This full colour, A2 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2007
TOTY2007 The trees of the year for 2007 are Pavetta schumanniana and Rhus pyroides. This full colour, A2 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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Trees of the year poster 2006
TOTY2006 The trees of the year for 2006 are Raphia australis (Kosi palm) and Burchellia bubalina (Wild pomegranate). This full colour, A2 poster provides descriptions and photographs for these trees including common names and meanings of the scientific names.

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